Library Of Congress Appoints Joy Harjo To A Second Term As U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo, the nation's first Native American to serve as Poet Laureate, was appointed to a second term by Librarian of Congress, Carla Hayden.
NPR logo Joy Harjo Gets A Second Term As U.S. Poet Laureate

Joy Harjo Gets A Second Term As U.S. Poet Laureate

Joy Harjo — seen here at a Hollywood gala in 2019 — has been appointed to a second term as U.S. Poet Laureate. VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images

Joy Harjo — seen here at a Hollywood gala in 2019 — has been appointed to a second term as U.S. Poet Laureate.

VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images

If the name of this year's U.S. Poet Laureate sounds familiar, that could be because Joy Harjo was also last year's pick for the job. In a statement announcing the reappointment, Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden called Harjo "an inspiring and engaging poet laureate," who would "help the Library showcase Native poets from coast-to-coast."

Harjo is the nation's first Native American Poet Laureate, and her own poetry often draws on her Muscogee Creek background, as well as feminist traditions. As Laureate she has been working on an upcoming anthology of Native poetry as well as an online map that the Library says will include "Native poets' biographies and recordings of them reading and discussing one of their poems."

Harjo recently kicked off a Washington Post/Library of Congress series, The Poetry of Home, where she read her her poem, "Perhaps The World Ends Here:"


The Poet Laureate's job is to promote appreciation and awareness of poetry.