West: Coronavirus-Related Restrictions And Reopenings Get the latest on coronavirus-related restrictions in Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming.
NPR logo West: Coronavirus-Related Restrictions By State

West: Coronavirus-Related Restrictions By State

Tourists shop at Bruce's Candy Kitchen during the coronavirus outbreak in Cannon Beach, Ore. The store is one of many businesses across the country that has reopened with social distancing and sanitation measures in place. Gillian Flaccus/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gillian Flaccus/AP

Tourists shop at Bruce's Candy Kitchen during the coronavirus outbreak in Cannon Beach, Ore. The store is one of many businesses across the country that has reopened with social distancing and sanitation measures in place.

Gillian Flaccus/AP

This is part of a series about coronavirus-related restrictions across the United States.

Jump to a state: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming, other states


Alaska

Status of Stay-at-Home order

  • Gov. Mike Dunleavy ordered Alaskans to shelter at home and close all nonessential businesses, effective March 28. People and businesses operating on-site must practice social distancing.
  • Phase One of reopening began on April 24. As of May 22, the state is in Phase Three.

Reopening

  • Phase One of the state's five-phase economic reopening plan started on April 24. Phase Two began May 8 and allowed most nonessential businesses to resume limited operations in accordance with sector-specific guidance. Phase Three began May 22, allowing all businesses and entities to open at 100% capacity.
  • Beginning April 24, certain businesses and services can reopen if they follow strict health and safety guidelines. Those include limited dine-in services at restaurants, limited in-store shopping in retail stores and limited services at personal care and other nonessential non-public facing businesses.
  • Outdoor gym and fitness activities may resume, child care facilities and day camps can operate with limited capacity following specific social distancing and sanitation protocols and certain lodging and overnight camping facilities can reopen if they meet specific requirements.
  • Dunleavy issued an order allowing certain health care facilities to resume services "that require minimal protective equipment and safety protocols for pre-screening" beginning April 20, and allowing them to resume non-urgent or elective procedures "with defined safety protocols" starting May 4.
  • An April 23 health mandate establishes standardized protective measures for all independent commercial fishing vessels operating within Alaskan waters and ports.
  • In Phase Two, retail, restaurants and other nonessential businesses can open at 50% capacity with walk-ins permitted. Personal care services can operate at 50% capacity, or up to 20 customers, by reservation only. Swimming pools can open at 50% capacity. Bars, libraries, museums and fitness centers can operate at 25% capacity and take walk-ins. Social and religious gatherings are capped at 50 people.
  • The mandate limiting interstate and international travel and requiring visitors to self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival has been extended through June 5.
  • The governor issued a health mandate permitting travel between communities on the road system and in-state travel by the Alaska Marine Highway System. Travel remains prohibited to communities off the road system, with exceptions for critical infrastructure or personal needs.
  • In Phase Three, all businesses, houses of worship, religious gatherings, libraries museums, recreational activities and sport activities may open. Certain restrictions on travel, visitation to congregate living settings and K-12 schools remain in effect.
  • Anyone arriving in Alaska has been ordered to self-quarantine for 14 days and fill out a "mandatory Travel Declaration Form."
  • Beginning June 5, travelers from outside of the state will be asked to take a COVID-19 test within 72 hours of boarding their flight, instead of self-quarantining for two weeks upon arrival. Travelers who do not have proof of a negative test result will have the option of being tested at the airport or self-quarantining.

Closed, canceled and delayed

  • Travel within the state has been banned except in cases where it is "to support critical infrastructure or is for critical personal needs." This mandate, as well as the mandate on social distancing, have been extended indefinitely. New guidance effective April 24 permits some recreational intrastate travel and outdoor day activities, under certain conditions and with specific precautions.
  • Public and private schools are closed through the end of the academic year. Distance learning will continue, and the State of Alaska Incident Command will decide in April whether it is safe for small groups of students to meet with their teachers for final conferences in person.

Testing and tracing

  • The state is encouraging anyone who has symptoms to get tested for COVID-19.

Relief and resources

  • Dunleavy said the state would use non-congregate shelter options like hotels and dormitories to establish a temporary quarantine and isolation program for first responders, health care workers and homeless individuals or families with a confirmed positive case.
  • Dunleavy ordered the suspension of certain state regulations to allow for curbside pickup of alcohol and delivery of sealed beer and wine from restaurants with food orders.
  • State legislators approved the distribution of more than $1 billion in federal funding to communities, businesses, nonprofits and individuals financially impacted by the pandemic. Dunleavy's administration said on May 12 that it has started distributing CARES Act funds.
  • The Permanent Fund Dividend Division will begin distributing 2020 dividend checks to eligible Alaskans beginning in July instead of October.
  • As of June 1, eligible small businesses can apply to receive between $5,000 and $100,000 for COVID-19 emergency-related expenses through the AK CARES Grant Program.

Arizona

Status of Stay-at-Home order

  • Gov. Doug Ducey enacted a stay-at-home order on March 31. The order directs Arizonans to limit their time away from their place of residence, with exceptions for performing and utilizing essential activities and services. Individuals must maintain six feet of distance from others when out in public. The order was extended until May 15.

Reopening

  • The stay-at-home order was replaced on May 16 by an executive order outlining guidance for the next phase of economic recovery. More sectors can reopen incrementally in line with guidance for employers and individuals.
  • Under a revised stay-at-home order, retail businesses that were previously closed can begin offering curbside pickup on May 4 and expanded in-person operations on May 8. The state has issued mandatory guidance for retail businesses and customers.
  • Ducey announced that salons and barber shops can resume appointment-based services beginning May 8, and restaurants and coffee shops can resume physically-distant dine-in services beginning May 11. The state has issued additional safety guidelines for those sectors.
  • Anyone traveling to Arizona through any airport in the state "from an area with substantial community spread," including but not limited to the New York Tri-State area, must self-quarantine for 14 days.
  • Ducey signed an April 22 executive order allowing hospitals and health care providers to resume certain elective surgeries beginning May 1 if they can prove they have implemented specific safety measures.
  • Major league sports can begin a limited reopening, without fans, starting May 16.
  • As of May 13, pools, gyms, fitness providers and spas can open if they follow physical distancing and sanitation protocols.
  • The state released guidance for places of worship resuming operations, though they were never officially ordered closed.
  • The Arizona Enrichment Centers Program is expanding to offer prioritized child care for children of grocery store employees and food bank workers. It will continue offering care and scholarships to eligible families through the end of July.
  • Grand Canyon National Park began a gradual reopening the weekend of May 16.
  • The state released guidance for the resumption of organized youth sports and activities.
  • Ducey announced that schools will resume in-person instruction at the start of the academic year in line with guidance. The Arizona Department of Education has released a roadmap for reopening schools.

Closed, canceled and delayed

  • Public schools were ordered closed through the end of the academic year.

Testing and tracing

  • The state is partnering with the University of Arizona to offer 250,000 antibody tests for health care workers and first responders.
  • The state health department expanded its testing criteria on April 23 to include anyone who thinks they have been exposed to, and could be infected with, the coronavirus. Testing had previously been limited to only high-risk individuals and those showing symptoms.
  • The state is boosting access to COVID-19 diagnostic and antibody testing through partnerships with universities and private sector health care companies. The Arizona Department of Health Services launched the "Arizona Testing Blitz" on April 27, aiming to perform 10,000 to 20,000 tests every Saturday for three weeks beginning May 2. On May 18, Ducey announced the blitz was extended for an additional two weeks.
  • Ducey announced a plan to test all staff and residents of long-term care facilities, as well as individuals in the state's prisons. The state Department of Health Services will partner with private-sector labs to conduct testing at 147 long-term care facilities and provide antibody tests for correctional officers.
  • On May 20, Ducey announced the state had begun testing all residents and staff at in long-term care and skilled-nursing facilities. It is also expanding testing of inmates and prison staff, including by partnering with the University of Arizona to provide antibody testing to all correctional officers.

Relief and resources

  • The governor signed an executive order allowing pharmacists "to utilize their professional judgement" in filling medication refills for up to 90 days. For filling COVID-19 prescriptions of hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine, the prescription "must be presented with a diagnosis code for COVID-19 from the prescriber."
  • The governor announced $5 million in funding for people having trouble paying rent because of the outbreak.
  • The state received $9.8 million in funding for the Emergency Food Assistance Program, which provides emergency food and nutrition assistance to low-income individuals.
  • An executive order signed on March 24 delays the enforcement of eviction action orders for renters for 120 days.
  • An April 6 executive order halts evictions through May 31 for small businesses and nonprofits that are unable to pay rent because of financial hardship caused by the coronavirus.
  • Ducey signed an executive order providing civil liability protections to health care workers.
  • The new deadline for filing and paying state income tax is July 15.
  • The state will provide Pandemic Electronic Benefit Transfer school meal replacement benefits to the households of the nearly 600,000 students eligible for free or reduced-price school meals.
  • Arizona's Medicaid agency is advancing more than $41 million in scheduled payments to hospitals, primary care providers and behavioral health professionals to ensure continuity of care.
  • Cisco is partnering with the state to install public WiFi access points at local libraries in high-need communities.
  • Ducey announced on May 12 that more than $8.2 million had been donated to the AZ Coronavirus Relief Fund. The funds will support grants for nonprofit organizations as well as the purchase and distribution of personal protective equipment.
  • The state launched the Return Stronger upskilling website, through which individuals can connect with career counselors and explore training opportunities.
  • Ducey announced $300,000 in grant funding for organizations providing individuals in need with rental assistance, telehealth and transportation to health services.
  • Ducey has announced allocations of the AZ Coronavirus Relief Fund to food pantries as well as various programs and organizations supporting children with special needs, foster families, out-of-school child care providers, senior citizens, the home-bound and medically vulnerable individuals.
  • The state is providing more than $441 million in coronavirus relief funding to cities, towns and counties. It is also creating a $150 million Arizona Express Pay Program to expedite FEMA reimbursement for the coronavirus-related expenses of entities such as local governments, tribal communities, nonprofit hospitals and school districts.

California

Status of Stay-at-Home order

  • Gov. Gavin Newsom issued an order mandating that individuals must stay home, except for activity "needed to maintain continuity of operation of the federal critical infrastructure sectors, critical government services, schools, childcare, and construction." Essential services such as grocery stores and pharmacies will remain open. The order took effect March 19 and will last "until further notice."
  • Health officials issued guidelines saying it is "preferable" for individuals to wear face masks or cloth face coverings when "going into an environment where physical distancing is all but impossible," including grocery stores.

Reopening

  • The governors of California, Oregon and Washington announced the Western States Pact on April 13. The framework offers principles and goals for a shared approach to reopening states' economies. Colorado and Nevada joined the pact on April 27.
  • On April 22, Newsom announced plans to allow hospitals and health systems to resume delayed medical services such as heart valve replacements, angioplasty and tumor removals, and critical preventative procedures like colonoscopies.
  • The state issued guidance for the reopening of offices, outdoor museums and curbside pickup at malls and strip malls as of May 12.
  • The state moved into Stage 2 of modifying the stay-at-home order on May 8. Counties can choose to continue their own stay-at-home orders and other restrictions based on local conditions. Certain counties may also move through Stage 2 more quickly if they meet the state's readiness criteria. As of May 14, 18 of the state's 58 counties are eligible to move from the "early" to "expanded" phase of Stage 2.
  • Newsom announced that the state is loosening its variance criteria to allow more counties to accelerate their reopening process. Local jurisdictions will be able to move further into Stage 2 based on their ability to increase testing, work with nursing homes and stabilize hospitalization and case rates.
  • In Stage 2, some retail, manufacturing and logistics businesses are able to resume limited operations statewide if they can comply with state guidelines. Lower-risk establishments such as bookstores, clothing stores, florists and sporting goods stores can reopen with modifications like curbside pickup. Offices, in-house restaurant dining and shopping malls will remain closed.
  • Counties that have been granted variance to enter Expanded Stage 2 can plan to open the following sectors more rapidly: destination retail, dine-in restaurants and schools with modifications. Newsom released updated industry guidance for businesses reopening in Stage 2.
  • As of May 25, houses of worship and in-store retail shopping can reopen with modifications statewide, subject to approval by county public health departments.
  • As of May 26, certain counties can choose to reopen hair salons and barber shops in line with specific protocols.

Closed, canceled and delayed

  • With some exceptions, people are not allowed to visit family members in hospitals or nursing homes.
  • Newsom said on April 1 that families and educators should operate "with the expectation now that schools will not reopen, but classes are in" for the rest of the academic year.

Testing and tracing

  • Newsom said President Trump committed to sending California 350,000 testing swabs over two weeks. The state is working to establish an additional 80 to 100 testing sites, and start deploying 25,000 tests per day as of April 30. It is also recommending testing asymptomatic health care workers, correctional officers and first responders.
  • Newsom announced the launch of California Connected, a statewide contact tracing program and public awareness campaign. Part of this effort involves training and deploying 10,000 contact tracers.

Relief and resources

  • Newsom signed an executive order March 30 ordering a 90-day extension for small businesses for tax returns and tax payments. The order also extends the statute of limitations to file a claim for a tax refund by 60 days.
  • Newsom says that financial institutions will offer a 90-day grace period for mortgage payments to people economically impacted by the outbreak.The governor also banned all evictions through May 31.
  • Newsom signed an executive order expanding access to child care for essential workers.
  • California is working to expand its hospital capacity to accommodate COVID-19 patients. Newsom said on April 6 that the state is setting up federal medical stations and alternate care facilities to care for patients. It has also leased and reopened two recently shuttered hospitals and received a naval medical ship from the federal government to use as surge facilities.
  • State emergency legislation released $100 million to support child care services for essential workers and vulnerable populations.
  • California is investing $42 million over three months into programs aimed at supporting foster youth, keeping families together and reducing child abuse.
  • An April 14 executive order calls for all discharge and reentry hearings at the Division of Juvenile Justice to be held via video conference. Newsom previously ordered a temporary halt to the intake of youth offenders into DJJ.
  • Newsom announced $75 million in statewide Disaster Relief Assistance funding to support undocumented Californians impacted by COVID-19. Approximately 150,000 adults will receive a one-time cash benefit, with households capped at $1000.
  • An April 16 executive order gives two weeks of paid sick leave to certain food sector workers, including delivery drivers and agriculture, grocery store and fast food chain workers. The order also increases sanitary measures by permitting workers at food facilities to wash their hands every 30 minutes or as needed.
  • Newsom signed another April 16 order adjusting admissions requirements for the California State University system, providing flexibility on background checks for critical infrastructure sectors and permitting licensed food trucks to operate in roadside rest areas for 60 days.
  • An April 17 order allows certain foster youth programs to perform necessary functions using processes other than face-to-face interactions, supporting continuity of care.
  • California has secured nearly 11,000 hotel and motel rooms across 42 counties for vulnerable individuals experiencing homelessness. On April 18, Newsom announced that the Motel 6 chain would make all of its corporate-owned locations available to counties through an agreement which could provide up to 5,025 additional rooms.
  • The California Public Utilities Commission and the California Department of Education will distribute a total of $30 million to cover the cost of hot spots, computing devices and internet service in eligible households and communities.
  • Newsom launched the California Volunteers' #CaliforniansForAll service initiative, which connects nonprofit organizations with people looking to volunteer in their community.
  • A multi-state initiative will expand payment relief for people with private and non-federal student loans, which are not covered by the CARES Act. The agreement expands protections to student loan borrowers in California, Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, New Jersey, Vermont, Virginia and Washington.
  • Newsom signed an executive order prohibiting debt collectors from garnishing individual COVID-19-related financial assistance.
  • An April 23 executive order extends some Department of Motor Vehicles deadlines and suspends late fees for expired vehicle registrations. It also temporarily allows retailers to provide bags to customers with no charge — suspending the state's ban on single-use plastic bags.
  • Newsom announced initiatives to support older Californians, including a meal delivery program, a wellness check-in call partnership and an emotional support talk line.
  • Newsom announced $3.64 million in new funding to expand the state's Farm to Family program.
  • Newsom signed an executive order temporarily allowing adults to obtain marriage licenses through videoconferencing.
  • Newsom announced that workers who contract COVID-19 on the job during the stay-at-home order may be eligible to receive workers' compensation.
  • An executive order waives penalties on property taxes for residents and small businesses experiencing financial hardship due to the pandemic.
  • Newsom issued an executive order requiring vote-by-mail ballots be sent to every registered voter in the state ahead of the General Election in November.
  • Newsom later signed an executive order designed to ensure sufficient safe in-person voting opportunities are available for the General Election. The order requires counties to provide three days of early voting starting the Saturday before election day, and allows them to consolidate voting locations as long as there is at least one voting location per 10,000 registered voters. Ballot drop-box locations must also be available between October 6 and November 3.
  • A May 8 executive order extends certain professional and procedural deadlines.
  • CalFresh recipients can use their EBT cards to make online purchases at Amazon and Walmart.
  • The California Department of Motor Vehicles further extended expiring driver's licenses. Licenses for drivers age 70 and up that would expire in June or July are extended 120 days, and expiring licenses for drivers under 70 are now valid through July.
  • California is providing additional food assistance to families with children eligible for free or reduced-price school meals through the Pandemic Electronic Benefit Transfer program.
  • The state is expanding resources and support for victims of domestic violence in light of the pandemic. Initiatives include additional funding for domestic violence centers, free accommodation and transportation for victims of domestic violence and text-to-911 capabilities.
  • An executive order extends authorization for local governments to halt evictions for renters impacted by the pandemic through July 28, and eases other regulatory and procedural burdens.

Colorado

Status of Stay-at-Home order

  • Gov. Jared Polis issued a stay-at-home order effective March 26, which was extended through April 26. The order directed Coloradans to stay home, except for performing certain essential activities and jobs.
  • People are required to stay at least 6 feet from others in public.
  • An executive order requires workers in critical industries, including at long-term care facilities, to wear non-medical face coverings on the job and while serving the public. They are also required to wear gloves, if the employer provides them, when in contact with customers or goods.
  • On June 1, Polis signed an order transitioning the state from Safer at Home to "Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors." While high-risk individuals were previously required to stay home, the new order encourages them to spend time in outdoor spaces while social distancing. It also extends earlier Safer at Home provisions, such as limiting public gatherings to no more than 10 people and encouraging businesses to continue telework policies, for another 30 days.

Reopening

  • On April 15, Polis announced the key indicators that will guide any decision to begin lifting Colorado's social distancing policies.
  • Polis encouraged faith leaders to offer online or drive-in services for religious holidays, and issued guidelines for places of worship.
  • Colorado and Nevada joined California, Oregon and Washington in the Western States Pact on April 27.
  • On April 27, the state moved into the "Safer at Home" phase, where people except for seniors and vulnerable populations are encouraged rather than required to stay home. Polis relaxed and extended the order until June 1, allowing more facilities to reopen before then.
  • Polis said the goal of "Safer at Home" is to maintain 60-65 percent physical distancing. Gatherings larger than 10 people are banned, people must wear face coverings in public and avoid unnecessary travel, and reopened retail and personal services businesses must take strict precautions. Nightclubs, gyms and spas will remain closed.
  • Under the updated Safer at Home order, restaurants can open for in-person dining with capacity limits beginning May 27, but are encouraged to offer as much outdoor service as possible. Bars will remain closed.
  • Beginning April 27, retail businesses can open for curbside delivery, and real estate showings can resume. Elective medical, dental and veterinary procedures can resume if they follow specific safety protocols.
  • Beginning May 1, personal services can begin operating and retail businesses can phase-in a public opening, provided they implement best practices.
  • Starting May 4, offices can reopen at 50% in-person staff capacity and must practice social distancing. Businesses are encouraged to allow workers to continue telecommuting. Also as of that day, child care facilities can reopen if they meet certain requirements.
  • Under the "Safer at Home" phase, local governments have the flexibility to match or exceed state guidelines, and can relax guidelines with proof of 14 days of infection decline and a locally-approved COVID-19 "suppression plan."
  • As of May 12, Coloradans can make reservations at campgrounds in state parks in counties that have chosen to reopen them. Counties are not required to reopen campgrounds, and people are encouraged to continue recreating locally.
  • Private campsites can open as of May 25.
  • Children's day camps and youth sports camps can open starting June 1. Residential camps will remain closed in June.
  • Polis said individuals can now travel beyond their county for recreation as long as they abide by local restrictions, but urged older adults to stay home.
  • Short-term rentals can reopen as of June 1, in line with state guidance.

Closed, canceled and delayed

  • The governor announced on April 20 that K-12 school districts and post-secondary institutions will continue to suspend in-person learning for the rest of the academic year.

Testing and tracing

  • Polis unveiled an interactive map of community-based COVID-19 testing sites across the state.
  • COVID-19 testing is available statewide for anyone experiencing symptoms.
  • Polis announced that more than 800 AmeriCorps and Senior Corps members will help with contact tracing and other COVID-19 response efforts.
  • Polis said on June 2 that anyone who attends demonstrations can get tested for free at any of the state's testing sites.

Relief and resources

  • On March 29, the federal government approved Polis' request to declare a Major Disaster, making the state eligible for federal disaster funding and FEMA assistance.
  • Polis issued a one-month extension for filing and remitting state and state-administered local sales tax, moving the deadline to May 20. Deadlines for state severance taxes have been moved to May 15. Polis also extended certain state income tax payment deadlines until July 15.
  • An April 7 executive order extended limits on evictions, foreclosures, and public utility disconnections and expedited unemployment insurance claims processing, and was renewed on May 29.
  • Polis also extended executive orders on the temporary suspension of elective medical procedures, the closure of ski areas and the issuance of marriage licenses with government offices closed. As of late May, ski resorts can work to secure approval to reopen from their local authorities.
  • An April 11 executive order suspends certain regulatory statutes related to juvenile justice, regional centers and behavioral health for 30 days. On April 23, Polis suspended some additional statutes and extended the order for 30 more days.
  • Polis signed an executive order supporting the provision of child care for essential workers and temporarily waiving certain statutes to enable schools to focus on "delivery of instruction and associated student services."
  • On April 14, Polis extended an earlier order, which limits in-person contact for the 2020 elections, for an additional 30 days.
  • The state has secured a total of five sites available to serve as alternative care facilities.
  • Polis signed an executive order that suspends certain regulatory requirements to make more professionals eligible for the health care workforce. On May 14, he extended it for an additional 30 days.
  • State income tax payment deadlines have been moved to July 15, in alignment with the federal extension.
  • A multi-state initiative will expand payment relief for people with private and non-federal student loans, which are not covered by the CARES Act. The agreement expands protections to student loan borrowers in California, Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, New Jersey, Vermont, Virginia and Washington.
  • An executive order authorizing certain state agencies to extend expiration dates for licenses, such as state park passes and licenses for health care facilities and commercial drivers, was renewed on April 23 for 30 more days.
  • The state received a $7.9 million federal funding match for telemedicine and other health innovation projects.
  • Polis made proactive cuts to certain state programs and services in order to reduce $228.7 million from the budget.
  • On May 7, Polis extended the state's disaster emergency declaration for an additional 30 days, providing additional funding for COVID-19 response efforts and continuing the employment of the Colorado National Guard.
  • An executive order extended the deadline for filing and remitting state severance tax until May 15.
  • The state is partnering with Rocky Mountain Public Media to offer remote literacy lessons to K-3 learners.
  • Polis signed three executive orders protecting ballot access during the pandemic. The orders provide flexibility for electronic petitions and remote signature gathering, and limits in-person contact for the 2020 elections.
  • Polis signed an executive order allowing alternate care sites to operate in the state.

Hawaii

Status of Stay-at-Home order

  • Gov. David Ige issued a statewide stay-at-home order effective March 25. Individuals may leave their place of residence only to perform essential activities, engage in essential businesses and operations, and conduct work that cannot be completed remotely. The order was extended through May 31.
  • Penalties for intentionally breaking the stay-at-home order include a fine of up to $5,000, a year in prison, or both.

Reopening

  • A May 5 proclamation authorizes the first group of businesses to reopen starting May 7, and allows residents to leave their homes to patronize certain businesses and activities.
  • Phase 1 of the state's reopening began at 12:01 a.m. on May 7, though restrictions differ between counties. For example, retail businesses on O'ahu could not open until May 15, and Maui county kept retail, most repair shops and malls closed.
  • Ige announced on May 22 that the counties of O'ahu, Maui and Kaua'i are allowing "medium-risk" businesses and operations to reopen.
  • The following businesses and operations can reopen as of May 7: non-food agriculture, auto dealerships, car washes, licensed child care services, pet grooming services, observatories, retail, repair services and shopping malls. They must follow specific social distancing protocols.
  • The state Department of Transportation is coordinating the reopening of stations for periodic motor vehicle inspections beginning May 15. Safety check certificates and stickers expiring by May 31 will remain valid until August 31.
  • Select state parks and monuments across the state are reopening for socially-distant hiking and beach access. Visitors must keep moving, and gatherings are prohibited.
  • On May 18, Ige released a four-phase reopening plan. The plan establishes an 14-day observation period between decision points, and allows the state to move back phases if disease activity significantly increases. County mayors have the authority to make their own decisions about reopening and restrictions, with the governor's approval.
  • In Phase 2, which is set to begin in June, indoor gathering places and exercise facilities will be able to reopen, as well as museums, theaters, personal services and dine-in restaurants.
  • The state Department of Education announced that its summer programming will be delivered through multiple platforms, including in-person and distance learning and mobile support for students and families. Summer school programs will be offered primarily through distance learning, with some face-to-face options for high-need students.
  • Beginning May 26, patrons can schedule a Library Take Out appointment to pick up items on hold at 47 of the state's 51 public libraries.
  • Ige approved mayors' requests to open additional businesses and services in three counties beginning June 1.
  • The state will lift the quarantine requirement for inter-island travelers on June 16. Travelers will be required to undergo thermal screening at the airport and fill out a form with health questions.

Closed, canceled and delayed

  • In March, Ige ordered a 14-day self-quarantine for everyone arriving in Hawaii as well as inter-island travelers.
  • The Hawaii State Department of Education announced that enrichment and distance learning would continue through May 28, the last day of the school year.
  • Summer school at the ten University of Hawai'i campuses will be held online, though in-person classes may be added in the later part of the summer.

Testing and tracing

  • The University of Hawaiʻi is partnering with the Hawaiʻi Department of Health to create a one-year, $2.5 million contact tracer training program. They will offer two training tracks for participants of different backgrounds, with a two-to-three day course and a two-to-three month course. They plan to train 300 tracers and increase the university's capacity to prepare 100 community health workers each year.

Relief and resources

  • The Democratic party-run presidential primary is switching to all mail-in voting.
  • The Hawaii State Judiciary has temporarily postponed most traffic, criminal and civil cases. Trials in civil, criminal and family courts must be delayed to after May 29.
  • The state's Department of Health is encouraging health care professionals not currently working in clinical roles, including students and retirees, to volunteer for the Hawaii Medical Reserve Corps.
  • Students enrolled at any of the ten University of Hawai'i campuses can apply for the Urgent Student Relief Fund. The fund was created by donors to support students experiencing "urgent financial distress" because of the outbreak.
  • An April 17 emergency proclamation places a moratorium on residential evictions, which has since been extended through June 30. Violations may result in fines or prison time.
  • Ige signed an executive order permitting county liquor commissions to allow the sale of unopened beer and wine with food orders.
  • Ige announced on April 22 that his administration is working with the Hawaii State Department of Health to set up a temporary quarantine and isolation center on Oahu for people who are sick and experiencing homelessness.
  • Ige announced that florists may resume operations beginning May 1 if they comply with social distancing requirements.
  • Through the CARES Act, $300 million is available for eligible states, tribes and territories with coastal and marine fisheries that have been impacted by the pandemic.
  • The state launched an emergency rental assistance program to provide a total of $7 million in relief to eligible beneficiaries.

Idaho

Status of Stay-at-Home order

  • Gov. Brad Little issued a statewide stay-home order on March 25, effective for 21 days. He extended the order through April 30.

Reopening

  • Little introduced the "Recreate Responsibly Idaho" campaign, which offers guidelines for people who want to partake in outdoor recreation during the stay-at-home order. Guidelines include practicing social distancing, limiting travel between counties, and refraining from high-risk activities.
  • On April 23, Little announced a four-phase plan to help Idaho rebound from the economic impacts of COVID-19. The state must meet specific criteria before progressing to new phases, and businesses must follow certain protocols in order to reopen.
  • Idaho entered Stage 1 of reopening on May 1. In this period, 90 percent of businesses could resume operations with physical distancing and sanitation protocols. People should avoid gatherings of any size and nonessential travel, and should continue teleworking if possible.
  • Idaho entered Stage 2 on May 16. In this stage, 95 percent of businesses can operate in line with safety protocols. Salons, indoor gyms and dine-in restaurant seating can reopen, with restrictions. Individuals should continue wearing masks and practicing physical distancing, telework whenever possible and minimize nonessential travel.
  • Beginning in Stage 2, only visitors from hot spots with "prevalent community spread" must self-quarantine for two weeks upon entering the state.
  • Little released protocols for indoor gyms and recreational facilities to implement in order to open in Stage 2 of the Idaho Rebounds plan.
  • The Idaho Fish and Game Commission resumed sales of nonresident licenses, tags and permits on May 16.
  • Public health officials issued guidance for gatherings and public events in each stage of reopening. Certain events must be planned far in advance, and some event timelines extend beyond Stage 4.
  • The state has issued protocols for bars, breweries, wineries, distilleries and outdoor pools, splashpads and waterparks opening in Stage 3.
  • Stage 3 of reopening began on May 30, allowing bars and movie theaters to open in line with specific protocols. Only out-of-state travelers from areas of high spread are required to self-quarantine for two weeks upon arrival. Nonessential travel can resume to areas that allow it and do not have ongoing transmission. Employees should continue to telework when possible, especially if they are considered vulnerable, and should return to on-site work in phases. Gatherings of up to 50 people are allowed, with proper social distancing and other precautions.

Closed, canceled and delayed

  • Idaho's May 19 primary election was conducted by mail.
  • The State Board of Education voted on April 6 to extend the "soft closure" of public school buildings through the end of the academic year, but is also giving local districts and charter schools the flexibility to reopen facilities if they satisfy certain criteria.
  • In Stage 3, visits to senior living and other congregate facilities are prohibited, and large venues and sporting events remain closed.

Testing and tracing

  • A public-private task force, announced April 24, was established to create a COVID-19 testing strategy.

Relief and resources

  • The governor issued proclamations allowing emergency refills of up to 90 days for existing medications while also suspending Medicaid copay requirements during this emergency.
  • The state moved nearly $40 million to a disaster relief fund available immediately to first responders, health care workers and groups working to provide ventilators, hospital beds, rapid test kits and other critical supplies.
  • Little suspended regulations in order to increase access to telehealth services and make it easier for medical professionals fighting the coronavirus to obtain necessary licenses.
  • The week of April 20, Little issued proclamations extending previous emergency declarations and waiving additional regulatory restrictions on telehealth and behavioral health services.
  • More than 30,000 eligible small businesses across the state will receive Idaho Rebound cash grants totaling $300 million. Applications opened May 11.
  • Eligible providers can apply for the new Idaho Child Care Emergency Grant until June 30.
  • Small businesses can request a 30-day supply of personal protective equipment for employees and patrons through an online portal.
  • Self-employed individuals financially impacted by the pandemic can apply for up to $7,500 through Idaho Rebounds cash grants for small businesses.

Montana

Status of Stay-at-Home order

Reopening

  • The stay-at-home order expired for individuals on April 26. Places of worship can become operational, and must enforce social distancing measures.
  • The stay-at-home order expired for businesses on April 27. Main street and retail businesses can reopen if they can adhere to requirements to limit capacity, maintain strict physical distancing and encourage teleworking when possible. Businesses that cannot practice social distancing, such as movie theaters and gyms, will remain closed.
  • Restaurants, bars, breweries and distilleries can begin providing some on-site services with limited capacity beginning May 4.
  • Schools have the option to reopen beginning May 7. Local school boards can decide to resume in-person classes or continue with remote learning.
  • Beginning May 15, gyms, theaters and museums can operate under strict occupancy, sanitation and social distancing guidelines.
  • The state entered Phase Two of reopening on June 1. Vulnerable individuals should adhere to stay-at-home guidance.
  • In Phase Two, gatherings are limited to a maximum of 50 people. The 14-day quarantine from out-of-state travelers is no longer in effect. All businesses can operate in line with social distancing and sanitation guidelines.
  • Beginning June 1, restaurants, bars, breweries distilleries and casinos can expand to 75% capacity. Gyms, indoor group fitness classes, pools and hot tubs can operate at 75% capacity. Concert halls, bowling alleys and other places of assembly can operate with reduced capacity. The 24-person cap per child care facility is lifted. Employers should permit telework as much as possible.

Closed, canceled and delayed

  • Most visitation at nursing homes and long-term care facilities remains suspended in Phase Two.

Testing and tracing

  • FEMA delivered 5,000 nasal swabs to be used for COVID-19 testing throughout the state.
  • Bullock outlined a plan to increase Montana's testing capacity, with the goal of eventually being able to conduct 60,000 tests per month. The state later secured 19,500 swabs and 9,000 "viral transport medium" from the federal government.
  • Bullock said the state is partnering with Tribal Nations to test both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals.
  • Bullock announced the implementation of community snapshot testing for front-line workers in high-visitation communities, additional contact tracing resources and an informational campaign for responsible travel.

Relief and resources

  • The state has temporarily halted "evictions, foreclosures and cancellation of utility services including water, heating and internet service."
  • Bullock implemented emergency rules that make workers laid off or unable to work due to COVID-19 eligible for unemployment benefits, and waive the one week waiting period before receiving benefits.
  • Bullock directed the creation of a program to provide emergency rental assistance to families experiencing "substantial financial hardship" due to COVID-19.
  • An April 22 directive makes it easier for retired health care professionals and providers licensed out-of-state to join Montana's health care workforce. Bullock also ordered health insurers to provide the same coverage for telehealth services as in-person services, enabling residents to access routine health care services while social distancing.
  • The governor, first lady and Montana No Kid Hungry announced that seven communities will receive grants totaling $135,000 to address food access gaps related to the public health emergency.
  • Bullock announced $123 million in relief grants, which individuals and businesses can apply for beginning May 7. He said the state will put the first round of funding towards small business grants, emergency housing assistance, grants for local and tribal health centers and assistance to food banks and pantries.
  • Bullock announced that $10 million in CARES Act funding is available for child care providers.
  • Bullock directed $5 million in federal funding to extend energy assistance, providing supplemental benefits to approximately 18,000 Low Income Energy Assistance Program clients.
  • The state secured 500,000 N95 masks from FEMA, to be distributed to health care workers.
  • The Montana Business Adaptation Grant program will provide reimbursement for expenses related to COVID-19 safety. Businesses can apply for up to $5,000.

Nevada

Status of Stay-at-Home order

  • The state's initial stay-at-home directive expired on April 30. Gov. Steve Sisolak announced that the majority of stay-at-home measures would extend until May 15, with certain restrictions being lifted starting on May 1.
  • Phase 2 began May 29, allowing additional businesses and services to reopen.
  • People are strongly encouraged to wear face coverings in public. Employees and businesses must require employees who interact with the public to wear face coverings.

Reopening

  • Colorado and Nevada joined California, Oregon and Washington in the Western States Pact on April 27.
  • Sisolak announced on May 5 that Nevada Hospital Association members were ready resume medically necessary procedures. He said that while there were no previous statewide directives ordering health care providers to delay procedures, many had independently decided to do so.
  • The state's Department of Education released its Path Forward Plan and created a committee to develop guidance for the next school year.
  • The governor is giving individual counties increasing responsibility for determining how businesses in their jurisdictions will reopen. County directives must meet or exceed state standards.
  • The state entered Phase 1 of reopening on May 9, allowing some businesses to reopen with strict social distancing requirements. Individuals are encouraged to stay home except for essential activities, and gatherings larger than 10 people remain prohibited. Vulnerable populations should continue to shelter in place. Beginning May 1, all retail businesses, including cannabis dispensaries, were able to operate under curbside commerce models. Places of worship will be able to hold drive-in services as long as congregants remain in their vehicles. Restrictions will be lifted on some outdoor recreational activities, including golf, pickleball and tennis.
  • In Phase 1, restaurants can offer dine-in service limited to 50% of available seating capacity. Employees are required, and patrons are encouraged, to wear masks. Additionally, bar areas will stay closed, patrons must wait outside to be seated and reservations should be required.
  • Retail businesses are encouraged to continue online or call-in pickup and delivery operations. They can reopen at 50% occupancy, and must follow statewide standards. Open air malls may operate by these same standards. Indoor malls remain closed, but can establish outdoor pickup or curbside operation "to the extent practicable."
  • Retail cannabis dispensaries can conduct in-store sales if they submit plans and receive approval from the Marijuana Enforcement Division.
  • In Phase 2, beginning May 29, public and private gathering limits can increase to 50 people. People are encouraged to continue wearing masks in public and practicing social distancing. Employees must wear face coverings at work. State offices are able to resume some services if necessary, but are encouraged to continue online services. Gyms and fitness facilities can reopen with occupancy limits. Restrictions on restaurants and food establishments will continue, but bar areas in restaurants can open. Bars and taverns that do not serve food can reopen with restrictions.
  • Also in Phase 2, salons and other cosmetology businesses can open. Massage services and body art and piercing establishments can open by appointment only and with restrictions. Aquatic facilities, swimming pools and water parks can open with capacity limits. Museums, art galleries, zoos and aquariums can reopen with restrictions. Indoor venues like movie theaters, bowling alleys and malls can reopen with limits.
  • Certain live events such as sporting events, concerts and theater performances may be held for broadcast or live stream purposes, with no in-person spectators allowed.
  • Places of worship can open for gatherings no larger than 50 people. Sisolak encouraged them to continue providing virtual services.
  • The governor said youth sports and recreation will likely be allowed later in Phase 2.
  • The gaming industry will reopen with increased health and safety measures on June 4.

Closed, canceled and delayed

  • Nevada's secretary of state announced in April that the June 9 primary election would take place by mail with just one in-person polling location per county. State Democratic officials have filed a lawsuit, arguing that the limited number of polling places presents issues for social distancing and that the proposed plan to send mail-in ballots only to those with an address on file will disenfranchise potential voters.
  • Sisolak announced on April 21 that schools will remain closed and continue with distance learning for the rest of the academic year.
  • Visitors and residents returning from out of state have been urged to self-quarantine for two weeks after their arrival.
  • Adult entertainment establishments, nightclubs and day clubs will remain closed in Phase 2.

Testing and tracing

  • Sisolak announced on May 19 that Nevada had surpassed 103,000 tests statewide.
  • The Nevada Health Response Center launched an online testing locator map.
  • On June 1, Sisolak announced a community-based testing, laboratory analysis and statewide contact tracing plan, funded primarily through federal support. He also approved a standing order authorizing Nevada medical providers and trained personnel at medically-supervised testing units to collect testing samples.

Relief and resources

  • The governor signed an executive order banning the use of two prescription drugs — chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine — to treat COVID-19. It exempts those receiving in-patient treatment for lupus or other diseases. The regulation is intended to thwart hoarding of the drugs.
  • The state issued a moratorium on all evictions, with a 90-day grace period on mortgage payments.
  • The state received nearly $2 million in federal funding to expand access to psychiatric care.
  • The Nevada Rural Housing Authority announced its COVID-19 Emergency Assistance Program, which will provide one-time funding to residents of rural areas who are experiencing financial hardship due to the pandemic.
  • Sisolak issued a directive protecting Nevadans from garnishment of CARES Act funds.
  • The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is awarding approximately $51 million to 21 rural health care providers in the state.
  • Sisolak signed a directive allowing contracted staff to help process unemployment claims, providing the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation with emergency hiring flexibility through December 31.
  • Sisolak declared a state of fiscal emergency on May 11, giving Nevada the flexibility to redirect resources in order to cover shortfalls.
  • Sisolak announced that the state will extend the job search waiver until further notice, continuing access to unemployment insurance benefits for many Nevadans.
  • The Nevada Affordable Housing Assistance Corporation relaunched its Unemployment Mortgage Assistance Program, which offers up to $3,000 per month to eligible homeowners who have experienced job loss due to the pandemic.
  • Sisolak signed a directive allowing parole hearings to continue virtually during the pandemic.
  • The state launched a confidential call line with resources and support for health care workers.

New Mexico

Status of Stay-at-Home order

  • Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham issued a stay-at-home order requiring nonessential businesses to close and 100% of the nonessential workforce to work from home. Residents are instructed to make only emergency or essential outings. A modified public health order was extended through May 31, and lifted certain restrictions beginning May 16.

Reopening

  • Under the modified order, most retailers are able to operate at 25% of their maximum occupancy if they adhere to specific protocols. Houses of worship can operate at 25% capacity. Individuals are required to wear face masks in public settings, effective statewide May 16.
  • In Phase One, high-intensity contact establishments including gyms, indoor malls, dine-in restaurants and salons remain closed. Vacation rentals are prohibited for out-of-state residents, and a 14-day quarantine order is in place for out-of-state airport arrivals. Visitation to long-term care and other congregate living facilities are restricted.
  • An earlier public health order lifted certain restrictions beginning May 1. Nonessential retailers may provide curbside pickup and delivery if permitted by their business license. Child care may be extended to people operating nonessential businesses. Pet services can operate, golf courses can open, gun stores can operate by appointment only and state parks can reopen on a modified day-use-only basis.
  • Earlier orders required essential businesses still operating to limit occupancy in retail spaces and enforce social distancing protocols, and deems automobile dealerships, payday lenders and liquor stores nonessential. Hotels and other places of lodging may operate at no more than 25 percent of maximum occupancy, reduced from 50 percent.
  • Businesses that fail to comply could "lose their licenses to operate and face criminal or civil penalties."
  • Just before Easter, Lujan Grisham expanded the mass gathering ban to include houses of worship.
  • A phased reopening of eight state parks began on May 1. Nine additional state parks opened for day use only beginning May 15.
  • Beginning May 6, all large grocery and retail spaces, and all restaurants operating curbside and delivery service, must require employees to wear face coverings in the workplace. This order applies to all essential businesses operating as retail space, regardless of size, beginning May 11. Retails at their own discretion may require customers to wear face coverings.
  • Restaurants in most of the state can open limited outdoor dine-in service beginning May 27.
  • Lujan Grisham amended the public health order to allow for the statewide reopening of additional businesses, with restrictions, beginning June 1. Restaurants can open indoor seating at 50% occupancy, with bar and counter seating prohibited. Gyms can open at 50% occupancy, with no group fitness classes. Indoor malls can open at 25% occupancy, with food courts closed. Hair and nail salons, barber shops, massage services and tattoo parlors can operate at 25% occupancy and by appointment only. Drive-in theaters can open, and hotels can operate at 50% of their maximum capacity.
  • Nine state parks reopened for day use on May 30, with an additional five opening on June 1.
  • The New Mexico Motor Vehicle Division began a partial reopening on June 1, only by appointment and for services not available online.

Closed, canceled and delayed

  • Gatherings of five or more people in a single confined space are not allowed.
  • Lujan Grisham has ordered people traveling by plane to the state to self-quarantine for at least two weeks.
  • K-12 public schools will remain closed through the rest of the school year, and public education will switch to learn-at-home.

Testing and tracing

Relief and resources

  • The state Supreme Court rejected an emergency petition to make New Mexico's June 2 primary a mail election, ruling instead to order county clerks to send absentee ballot applications to voters. Lujan Grisham said in an April 15 tweet that she remained confident the election could be "conducted almost entirely if not entirely through mail."
  • An April 30 emergency order will allow polling places to operate subject to certain requirements, and emphasizes that the safest way to vote is by absentee ballot.
  • The New Mexico Indian Affairs Department has partnered with the Navajo Nation and several pueblos to deliver food to tribal communities.
  • The governor's office released an app that offers free 24-hour crisis and non-crisis support and access to additional mental health resources.
  • The state is distributing supplemental shipments of personal protective equipment to local entities like cities, counties, tribes, pueblos, elder care facilities and health clinics.
  • A state COVID-19 relief fund is awarding $550,000 in grants to five food banks across New Mexico.
  • Eligible drivers whose licenses have expired during the pandemic can obtain 90-day temporary licenses over email.
  • The New Mexico Human Services Department announced $4.62 million in new Medicaid payments to support nursing facilities in mitigating the spread of COVID-19.
  • The state has increased SNAP enrollment for eligible families, and provided an additional monthly stipend to households not already receiving maximum benefits in March and April.
  • New Mexico families with children eligible for free or reduced-price school meals will receive more than $97 million in additional food benefits through the Pandemic Electronic Benefit Transfer program.
  • The All Together NM Fund is awarding $750,000 in grants to businesses with five employees or fewer.
  • SNAP recipients can now purchase groceries online through Amazon and Walmart for home delivery.

Oregon

Status of Stay-at-Home order

  • Gov. Kate Brown issued an order directing Oregonians to "stay at home to the maximum extent possible" which remains in effect indefinitely. The order prohibits all gatherings, no matter what size, if people can't maintain a distance of six feet from each other.

Reopening

  • The governors of California, Oregon and Washington announced the Western States Pact on April 13. The framework offers principles and goals for a shared approach to reopening states' economies. Colorado and Nevada joined the pact on April 27.
  • On April 14, Brown introduced her "Reopening Oregon" plan, a public health framework for restarting public life and business.
  • Brown lifted an order delaying non-urgent medical procedures. Health care providers that can demonstrate they have met new requirements for COVID-19 safety and preparedness will be able to resume elective procedures beginning May 1.
  • Brown announced the limited reopening of some state parks, outdoor recreation facilities and ski areas beginning May 5. Camping opportunities will become available as federal, state, local and private providers are able to prepare their facilities for visitors.
  • A number of inland state parks resumed limited daytime service on May 6, and limited day-use "will slowly return" to other state parks the week of May 11. Certain high-density parks and boat accesses will remain closed.
  • On May 7, Brown announced the first phase of a reopening plan. Counties can begin lifting some restrictions when they meet certain requirements, and must stay in Phase 1 for at least 21 days. Thirty one of Oregon's 36 counties entered Phase 1 on May 15. Two additional counties joined on May 22, and another joined on May 23. An additional county was approved to enter Phase 1 on June 1.
  • Beginning May 15 across the state, standalone retail businesses such as furniture stores, art galleries, jewelry shops and boutiques can reopen if they comply with state guidelines. Child care, summer school, camps and youth programs can resume limited operations with specific protocols.
  • Certain restrictions are lifted in Phase 1, which most of the state entered on May 15. Restaurants and bars can reopen for limited sit-down service until 10:00 p.m., personal care services like salons and gyms can resume limited operations and local in-person gatherings of up to 25 people are permitted. All retail businesses, including malls and shopping centers, can open.
  • As of May 15 in counties not in Phase 1, grocery stores, pharmacies, banks, credit unions and gas stations are open. Restaurants are open for takeout only. Standalone retail operations can open in line with safety and social distancing guidelines, while indoor and outdoor malls remain closed. Non-emergency medical, dental and veterinary care is permitted. Personal care services are closed. With physical distancing measures in place, social gatherings are limited to a maximum of 10 people and cultural, civic and faith gatherings are capped at 25.
  • Brown issued finalized statewide and county Phase 1 guidance. She also released guidance for face coverings, summer school, public transit, gyms and homelessness and service providers.
  • State officials said the first 31 counties to move into Phase 1 will be eligible to begin Phase 2 as soon as June 5.
  • In Phase 2, gathering limits will increase to 50 people indoors and 100 people outdoors. Restaurants and bars can extend their curfews from 10 p.m to midnight. Movie theaters, churches and other large venues may be able to expand their occupancy to up to 250 people. Low-contact youth sports can return to play, in line with guidance about equipment sharing. Indoor activities such as bowling and pool will also receive specific guidance. While working from home is strongly recommended, employees may begin a limited return to indoor workplaces.

Closed, canceled and delayed

  • Oregon's K-12 and post-secondary schools are closed through the end of the academic year. Educators are encouraged to complete the term through distance learning.
  • According to the phased reopening plan, all large gatherings should be canceled "or at least significantly modified" through at least September.

Testing and tracing

  • On May 1, Brown outlined a plan to increase COVID-19 testing and tracing efforts, with the goal of being able to perform 30 tests a week for every 10,000 Oregonians and training at least 600 contact tracers. As part of the plan, state testing criteria is expanded to include anyone with symptoms.

Relief and resources

  • A temporary moratorium on all residential evictions has been put in place indefinitely, and landlords may not charge late fees for late rent or utility payments.
  • The state's tax filing and payment deadlines for personal income taxes and some other taxes have been extended through July 15.
  • Oregon will provide an extra $30 million in SNAP benefits to eligible households in both April and May.
  • The state fire marshal extended self-service at gas stations through April 25.
  • In an April 10 statement, Brown said decisions about potential early release for incarcerated individuals should be made on a case-by-case basis, and she had "no specific plans" to abandon that approach.
  • Brown announced on April 13 that the state would provide $8 million total to the Oregon Food Bank Network in weekly payments over the next two months.
  • As local governments begin their budget processes in the month of April, Brown issued an executive order directing them to "take necessary measures to facilitate public participation in decision-making," such as holding public hearings electronically or by phone.
  • An April 17 executive order prevents creditors or debt collectors from garnishing federal CARES Act recovery rebate payments.
  • Brown announced on April 20 that the Oregon National Guard will distribute approximately 395,000 pieces of personal protective equipment to long-term care facilities across the state.
  • Brown said she will preserve the Corporate Activities Tax, which businesses making more than $1 million must pay regardless of whether they make a profit. The Oregon Republican Party had called for a delay.
  • Oregon received 50,000 masks from Fujian Province, its sister state in China.
  • Oregon Occupational Safety and Health has enacted emergency rules ordering farmers to strengthen requirements in field sanitation, labor housing and transportation to protect agricultural workers.
  • The Oregon Health & Science University is enrolling 100,000 randomly selected Oregonians to voluntarily join its "Key to Oregon" research study, to better understand COVID-19 infection patterns.
  • Through the Pandemic Electronic Benefits Transfer program, Oregon will provide cash benefits to the families of the more than 351,000 children eligible for free or reduced-price school meals.
  • The state distributed $8.5 million in rent relief to community action agencies, to help tenants who have experienced a loss of income and are at risk of homelessness due to COVID-19.
  • The state is donating 1 million masks and 5,000 gallons of hand sanitizer to farm workers and agricultural producers.
  • Brown said an additional $30 million in food assistance will allow eligible Oregonians to receive the maximum SNAP benefit for June.
  • Brown announced a $30 million investment to secure the state's food supply chain and protect agricultural workers.

Utah

Status of Stay-at-Home order

  • On March 27, Gov. Gary Herbert issued a two-week "stay safe, stay home directive." It is not a shelter-in-place order, but instructs Utahns to stay home whenever possible. The directive was extended through April.

Reopening

  • On April 17, Herbert announced a second version of the Utah Leads Together plan, a three-phase pathway to reactivating the economy.
  • Also as of April 17, Utah's state parks are open to all except those under local health order restrictions.
  • The Utah Department of Health issued an updated public health order on April 21 allowing for the resumption of some elective procedures, in accordance with guidelines developed by the Utah Hospital Association.
  • The state moved from the "high risk" phase to the "moderate phase" of its recovery timeline on May 1. In this phase, Utahns are urged to stay home and work from home whenever possible. Vulnerable individuals and their household members were told to continue following "high risk" protocols. People must still maintain 6 feet of distance from others in public and wear face masks where that is not possible. Out of state travel remains limited, and anyone returning from high-risk areas must self-quarantine for 14 days.
  • Previously closed businesses like gyms, bars and personal care services can reopen if they exercise strict precautions. Dine-in services can resume if restaurants meet specific distancing and hygiene requirements, though takeout and delivery are encouraged.
  • A May 6 executive order clarifies guidelines pertaining to social gatherings, outdoor recreation, personal services, gyms and fitness centers during the moderate and low risk phases. No one should participate in sporting activities that require teammates to be within 10 feet of each other. Clients obtaining personal care services can remove their masks in cases where it would interfere with the service they are receiving. Gyms may allow "skills and conditioning activities" when social distancing is practiced. Private social interactions are allowable in groups of 20 or fewer in the moderate-risk phase, and 50 or fewer in the low-risk phase.
  • In the yellow or low-risk phase, most residents are no longer asked to "leave home infrequently." While schools remain closed, opportunities for driver's education will reopen. The gathering limit for private social interactions grows from 20 to 50 people. Youth and club team sports are permitted, with symptom checking and socially distanced spectators. Certain guidelines at swimming pools will be relaxed.
  • On May 20, Herbert announced the third version of the "Utah Leads Together Plan," which shares instructions for high-risk populations, addresses impacts on the state's multicultural community and outlines plans for economic recovery.
  • Much of the state moved into the "low risk" phase on May 16, with the exception of several cities and counties. Vulnerable populations must continue following high risk protocols, regardless of their community's designation. Herbert moved two additional counties into the low-risk, or yellow, phase on May 21.
  • Herbert issued an order moving two municipalities from low to moderate risk status on May 22.
  • Herbert issued an executive order updating guidelines pertaining to travel, educational institutions, social gatherings, entertainment, businesses and events in areas designated low risk, effective May 27.
  • Herbert moved additional areas to low risk status on May 29.

Closed, canceled and delayed

  • Public and charter schools will remain closed for the rest of the academic year.

Testing and tracing

  • Herbert introduced the Healthy Together app, which enables Utahns to track their symptoms and connect with COVID-19 testing while helping health officials perform contact tracing.

Relief and resources

  • Herbert ordered a moratorium on residential evictions for certain tenants who have been directly impacted by COVID-19.
  • Herbert has instructed residents to wear homemade masks in public places.
  • Herbert announced the creation of the Utah Multicultural Task Force Subcommittee, a group within the larger coronavirus task force that will address barriers facing minority communities.
  • Herbert announced "A Mask For Every Utahn," a public-private partnership that will provide a free face mask to residents who do not yet have one.
  • Herbert issued an executive order temporarily suspending enforcement on expired vehicle registrations through May 15.
  • On May 5, Herbert announced the launch of the "PPE Push Pack" program to support small businesses in their transition to "moderate risk" COVID-19 protocols. The public-private partnership provides a free one-week supply of personal protective equipment to sole proprietors and businesses with fewer than 50 employees.
  • Herbert suspended certain requirements for retail licensees serving alcoholic beverages, to ensure that pandemic-related closures mandated by public health do not cause licensing issues.
  • Farmers Feeding Utah delivered 18,000 pounds of lamb meat and 10,000 pounds of flour to assist the Navajo Nation.

Washington

Status of Stay-at-Home order

  • On March 23, Gov. Jay Inslee issued an order requiring "every Washingtonian to stay home unless they need to pursue an essential activity." The "Stay Home, Stay Healthy" order also closed all nonessential businesses and banned all gatherings for "social, spiritual and recreational purposes." It expired at the end of May.
  • High-risk populations must follow the "Stay Home, Stay Healthy" directives for three of the plan's four phases.

Reopening

  • The governors of California, Oregon and Washington announced the Western States Pact on April 13. The framework offers principles and goals for a shared approach to reopening states' economies. Colorado and Nevada joined the pact on April 27.
  • On April 21, Inslee announced "Washington's Recovery Plan," a framework for the loosening of restrictions and gradual return to public life, contingent on slowing the spread of COVID-19.
  • Inslee said on April 24 that "low-risk" construction projects already underway can resume if they comply with physical distancing and other requirements.
  • Inslee announced the partial reopening of certain outdoor recreation activities beginning May 5. Fishing, hunting and golfing will be permitted with appropriate safety precautions, as is day use of state parks, state public lands managed by the Department of Natural Resources and state Fish and Wildlife areas. Many state parks reopened on May 5 for day-use recreation, while several remain closed "until further notice."
  • Inslee issued guidance for drive-in religious services, as well as vehicle and vessel sales.
  • Low-risk higher education and critical workforce training work is allowed to resume as of May 5. Inslee released guidance for restarting essential workforce development programs.
  • Car wash operations can resume after meeting specific criteria, effective May 7. Inslee issued industry requirements and guidance.
  • Inslee signed an executive order on May 4 implementing the state's "Safe Start" recovery plan. The plan allows smaller counties to apply for a variance from the order, enabling them to loosen some restrictions sooner. Washington entered the first phase of gradual reopening on May 5.
  • Under Phase 1 of the reopening plan, only essential travel and some outdoor recreation is allowed. Social gatherings are not permitted, and only drive-in spiritual services can be held, with one household per vehicle. Essential businesses, existing construction projects, landscaping, car washes, pet walkers and automobile sales can operate. Retail stores can offer curbside pickup only.
  • Inslee announced new criteria for additional counties to apply for variances to move to Phase 2. As of May 28, there are 26 counties in Phase 2.
  • Inslee issued guidance for partially reopening the dine-in restaurant and tavern industry in counties granted variance to enter Phase 2, effective May 11.
  • For counties in Phase 2, limited in-store retail and additional manufacturing operations can resume effective May 12, in line with industry-specific guidance.
  • For counties in Phase 2, personal care and professional services can resume as of May 13, in line with state guidance.
  • For counties in Phase 2, additional outdoor recreation activities may resume as of May 14 in line with guidance. Permitted activities include guided ATV, paddle sports and horseback riding, tennis, guided fishing, go-carting, ORV/motocross and participant-only motorsports.
  • Inslee issued guidance for construction, golf and professional photography services in Phase 2. All construction, including new work, is allowed, and additional golf activities can resume for counties in that phase. Pet grooming operations can also resume.
  • The state is asking patrons at businesses to voluntarily provide contact information for one person per household, in case of COVID-19 exposure. Inslee said the information will be shared only with public health officials.
  • As of May 18, elective health services can resume at providers statewide for medical and dental providers that meet certain criteria.
  • In-person real estate operations with up to three people, as well as fitness and training operations, may resume beginning May 19 for counties in Phase 2. Fitness activities must be limited to groups of five or fewer trainees and one instructor.
  • As of May 27, religious and faith-based organizations in Phase 1 counties may host up to 100 people for outdoor services. In Phase 2, they can host up to 25% of their capacity or 50 individuals — whichever is less — and conduct in-home services of five people.
  • On June 1, Washington's stay-at-home order was officially replaced by Safe Start, a phased county-by-county reopening plan. Any county can apply to the Department of Health to move to the subsequent phase if they meet certain criteria.
  • Inslee issued guidance for in-person workforce training programs in Phases 1 and 2.
  • Inslee issued guidance for library operations in Phases 1 and 2, and drive-in theater operations for Phase 2.

Closed, canceled and delayed

  • All K-12 public and private schools in the state will remain closed through the remainder of the 2019-2020 academic year. School facilities may still be used for necessary in-person services like preparation of food service and child care, provided they follow public health guidelines.
  • Inslee issued a directive to state agencies to freeze all hiring, personal service contracts and equipment purchases, effective May 18. He called for higher education institutions and other boards and commissions to follow suit.

Testing and tracing

  • Inslee announced the launch of a statewide contact tracing initiative, with a team of over 1300 tracers set to be trained and ready by May 15.
  • After the state Department of Health ordered widespread testing at long-term care facilities, Inslee announced a plan to test all nursing home residents and staff by June 12, and all residents and staff at assisted living facilities with a memory care unit by June 26.

Relief and resources

  • The state has created a grant fund for small businesses, using a portion of the state's Strategic Reserve Fund.
  • Inslee, in partnership with nonprofits and local philanthropies, announced the launch of the WA Food Fund on April 7. The relief fund will work to meet increasingly high demand at food banks across the state.
  • Inslee announced on April 13 that the Department of Corrections would implement strategies for reducing the state's prison population, starting by focusing on the early release of vulnerable individuals through commutation and modified reentry programs. Two days later, he issued proclamation and commutation orders releasing certain eligible inmates ahead of their original release dates on or before June 29.
  • Inslee issued a proclamation extending certain rights and safeguards to high-risk workers so that they can protect themselves against COVID-19 without jeopardizing their employment status.
  • Three proclamations issued April 14 suspend certain criminal statutes of limitations, streamline the renewal of commercial driver licenses and learner permits, and protect consumer assets from debt collection.
  • Inslee expanded protections for renters in an April 16 proclamation, extending his initial moratorium on evictions and adding new provisions. The moratorium now covers hotels, motels, Airbnb rentals, public campgrounds and other transitional housing. Landlords are prohibited from raising rents, charging late fees and making threats.
  • Inslee has extended the eviction moratorium through August 1.
  • An expanded proclamation temporarily prohibits energy, water and landline phone providers from disconnecting residential customers due to nonpayment, refusing to connect those who were previously disconnected due to nonpayment, and charging late fees. It does not relieve customers from their obligation to pay utility bills.
  • A multi-state initiative will expand payment relief for people with private and non-federal student loans, which are not covered by the CARES Act. The agreement expands protections to student loan borrowers in California, Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, New Jersey, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington.
  • On April 23, Inslee announced the extension of 19 proclamations related to COVID-19, either through specific dates in May or the end of the state of emergency depending on which occurs first. Five proclamations related to long-term care were extended through May 9. Others suspending various deadlines and waivers were extended through May 4.
  • Nearly $300 million of the state's federal stimulus funding will be distributed to local governments that did not receive direct contributions under the CARES Act.
  • The office of Lt. Gov. Cyrus Habib announced a statewide mask-making initiative to encourage residents to create, wear and donate cloth masks.
  • Inslee issued guidance to clarify what kinds of elective medical procedures are permitted under an existing order.
  • On April 29, Inslee released a COVID-19 risk assessment dashboard to inform decisions about lifting restrictions. The five-dial dashboard will be updated weekly on Wednesdays.
  • Inslee signed a proclamation allowing candidates for public office to submit a filing fee petition without collecting signatures from registered voters.
  • Through the "CareerConnect@Home" program, students can participate in virtual conversations with professionals in various industries every day for the month of May to learn about different education and career pathways.
  • The state has opened more than 300 new drive-in WiFi hot spots to provide free temporary internet access to all residents, particularly students, without broadband service in their homes.
  • Inslee extended a proclamation protecting CARES Act payments from garnishment.
  • Washington was approved to operate Pandemic Electronic Benefit Transfer, a program that provides assistance to the families of children eligible for free or reduced-price school meals.
  • Inslee issued a proclamation with additional health and safety guidelines pertaining to worker housing, transportation and job site requirements for the agricultural industry. He later issued guidance clarifying these requirements.

Wyoming

Status of Stay-at-Home order

  • Wyoming did not enact a statewide stay-at-home order, though Gov. Mark Gordon issued a plea on March 25 for "citizens to stay home whenever possible, only going out when absolutely necessary." Certain businesses and services can reopen beginning May 1.

Reopening

  • On April 3, Gordon extended existing statewide health orders through April 30 and issued a directive requiring any person entering Wyoming from outside of the state to self-quarantine for 14 days. Beginning May 8, out-of-state travelers are no longer required to self-quarantine, though they are urged to be careful.
  • On April 23, Gordon announced a plan for gradually lifting restrictions. The phased approach to reopening will rely on six health metrics and give counties the flexibility to request variances based on local conditions.
  • Public health orders effective May 1 allow gyms, barber shops, hair salons and other personal care services to reopen under certain conditions. Child care and home day care centers may also operate with specific precautions. Businesses that choose to remain closed will still be eligible for Small Business Administration assistance.
  • The Department of Health issued guidance to hospitals and health care providers for resuming elective surgeries.
  • Counties are allowed to waive certain state public health regulations based on local health data. As of May 8, most counties have been granted variances for dining and/or gathering restrictions.
  • Gordon expressed support for the phased reopening of Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. Both parks began gradually lifting restrictions on May 18.
  • A modified public health order effective May 15 eases restrictions on certain businesses and increases the maximum gathering size to 25 people. Restaurants can offer indoor and outdoor dining service under specific conditions. Movie theaters and performance venues can reopen in a limited capacity. Gyms can reopen locker rooms, offer personal training and provide group classes for up to 20 participants. Child care facilities can allow up to 25 people in a classroom.
  • Roads, hiking trails and rock climbing routes at Devil's Tower National Monument reopened to public access on May 22, with limited services.
  • Effective June 1, outdoor gatherings of up to 250 people are permitted, provided there are social distancing and sanitation measures in place.

Closed, canceled and delayed

  • Gatherings of 25 people or more in a single room or confined space are prohibited. Previous orders capped gatherings at 10 people.
  • Wyoming Democrats will be conducting their presidential preference caucus entirely by mail. Voters must have registered Democrat by March 20 to be eligible, and ballots must have been received by April 17.
  • Gordon directed state agencies to institute position freezes, halt general fund contracts larger than $100,000 and implement a "rigorous review of major maintenance spending" to prepare for COVID-19 budget impacts.
  • Six of the state's largest rodeos, originally scheduled for late June and July, have been canceled.

Testing and tracing

  • Gordon said the state will test a percentage of residents and staff at each long-term care facility, and conduct weekly testing at facilities that have a confirmed case.

Relief and resources

  • The Taipei Economic and Cultural Office donated 50,000 medical face masks to the state.
  • Gordon allocated $17 million in federal funding to expand the state's testing contact tracing capabilities and grow its supply of personal protective equipment.

The first version of this page was originally published on March 12. This is a developing story. We will continue to update as new information becomes available.

NPR's Brakkton Booker, Merrit Kennedy, Vanessa Romo, Colin Dwyer, Laurel Wamsley, Aubri Juhasz and Bobby Allyn contributed to this report.


This is part of a series about coronavirus-related restrictions across the United States.

Northeast: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont

Midwest: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin

South: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia

West: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming