How we might work after coronavirus : The Indicator from Planet Money As businesses make plans to reopen their workplaces, we're probably going to find that these spaces will look very different than before.
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The Workplace In The COVID-19 Era

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The Workplace In The COVID-19 Era

The Workplace In The COVID-19 Era

The Workplace In The COVID-19 Era

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DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP via Getty Images
Co-founder and Chair of the First Love foundation foodbank, Aerold Bentley walks past goods for distribution to families, at the First Love foundation foodbank warehouse in Tower Hamlets in east London on April 24, 2020, (Photo by DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP via Getty Images)
DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP via Getty Images

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, most of us who had jobs did not work from home. We went to an actual workplace. And now, businesses all throughout the country—throughout the whole world—are having to re-design those workplaces to make them safe for the COVID-19 era, and after.

But different workplaces have different problems, and need different approaches to solve those problems. A factory will have to be re-designed in a way that's different from, say, a corporate office building—which itself has different problems from a retail store. To find out more about how companies are thinking about solving these kinds of problems, we called someone who runs a company that itself has three different kinds of workplaces.

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