The 'Murder Hornets' And The Honey Bees : 1A One hornet scouts out a honey bee hive. Then, the hornets attack. But how worried should we actually be?

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The 'Murder Hornets' And The Honey Bees

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The 'Murder Hornets' And The Honey Bees

1A

The 'Murder Hornets' And The Honey Bees

The 'Murder Hornets' And The Honey Bees

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/851463185/851569496" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Picture shows a honeybee resting on a comb in Stuttgart, southern Germany. SEBASTIAN GOLLNOW/SEBASTIAN GOLLNOW/DPA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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SEBASTIAN GOLLNOW/SEBASTIAN GOLLNOW/DPA/AFP via Getty Images

Picture shows a honeybee resting on a comb in Stuttgart, southern Germany.

SEBASTIAN GOLLNOW/SEBASTIAN GOLLNOW/DPA/AFP via Getty Images

With the coronavirus still at the top of our newsfeeds—and our minds—it would certainly be understandable if you haven't heard about the newest danger facing America: "murder hornets."

Something you should know is that Asian giant hornets have arrived in Washington. They are up to two and a half inches long. And they are dangerous. But...how dangerous exactly?

Michael Raupp answered that question and more for us. He's a professor of entomology at the University of Maryland, and curator of the popular "Bug of the Week" blog.

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