Members Of A Facebook Group Howl Together In The Evenings Worldwide More than half a million people around the world are now howling together in the evenings — they are the members of the Facebook group Go Outside and Howl at 8 pm.
NPR logo

Members Of A Facebook Group Howl Together In The Evenings Worldwide

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/852413523/852425249" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Members Of A Facebook Group Howl Together In The Evenings Worldwide

Members Of A Facebook Group Howl Together In The Evenings Worldwide

Members Of A Facebook Group Howl Together In The Evenings Worldwide

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/852413523/852425249" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

More than half a million people around the world are now howling together in the evenings — they are the members of the Facebook group Go Outside and Howl at 8 pm.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

More than half a million people around the world have found a new outlet for their pandemic-related stress - howling.

(SOUNDBITE OF HOWLING)

CHANG: That's thanks to a Facebook group called Go Outside and Howl at 8 p.m. Shelsea Ochoa and Brice Maiurro are the group's creators.

(SOUNDBITE OF HOWLING)

BRICE MAIURRO: There's no wrong way to howl.

SHELSEA OCHOA: Just howl however you feel.

(SOUNDBITE OF HOWLING)

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: From Oshkosh, Wisc., we're howling at the moon.

(SOUNDBITE OF HOWLING)

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #2: Tonight I'm howling for grandparents everywhere.

(SOUNDBITE OF HOWLING)

MAIURRO: One style of howl is the passionate, loud and sharp and bright. (Howling).

OCHOA: A wolf chicken howl.

(SOUNDBITE OF HOWLING)

MAIURRO: And also the I-might-have-been-raised-by-wolves-because-I'm-so-good-at-howling howl.

(SOUNDBITE OF HOWLING)

OCHOA: A very timid howl - like, I-hope-this-is-OK-with-everyone howl.

(SOUNDBITE OF HOWLING)

OCHOA: Some people, I feel like I can hear the pain in their howls.

MAIURRO: Yeah, there's longing in a lot of howling.

OCHOA: And grieving.

(SOUNDBITE OF HOWLING)

MAIURRO: People howl for lost loved ones.

OCHOA: About domestic violence.

MAIURRO: And of course frontline workers, health care workers.

(SOUNDBITE OF HOWLING, CLANKING)

OCHOA: The reason that wolves howl is to stay connected and when they're looking for each other.

(SOUNDBITE OF HOWLING)

OCHOA: I think that's totally on point with the reason why people are drawn to howling, too. It's to feel less lonely.

(SOUNDBITE OF HOWLING)

OCHOA: So come outside at 8 o'clock and howl.

MAIURRO: Or howl right now if you want to.

(SOUNDBITE OF HOWLING)

CHANG: That moment was produced by NPR's Abby Wendle. (Howling).

(SOUNDBITE OF SOUND NOMADEN AND MSP SONG, "SNOWFLAKE")

Copyright © 2020 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.