Steve Martin We're revisiting one of our favorite interviews from our archive, with comic Steve Martin from when his memoir 'Born Standing Up' was released in 2008. When he started doing comedy in the 1970s, his audiences often didn't know what to make of him. His material was somewhere between vaudeville and performance art. As a kid, he sold guide books in Disneyland, and hung out in magic shops while spending hours working up a magic act. Martin tells us about his years as a stand up comic—and why he ended that part of his career.

Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the recent 90th birthday salute to Broadway composer and lyricist Stephen Sondheim, which is available online.
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Steve Martin

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Steve Martin

Steve Martin

Steve Martin

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/852751469/852864717" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

We're revisiting one of our favorite interviews from our archive, with comic Steve Martin from when his memoir 'Born Standing Up' was released in 2008. When he started doing comedy in the 1970s, his audiences often didn't know what to make of him. His material was somewhere between vaudeville and performance art. As a kid, he sold guide books in Disneyland, and hung out in magic shops while spending hours working up a magic act. Martin tells us about his years as a stand up comic—and why he ended that part of his career.

Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the recent 90th birthday salute to Broadway composer and lyricist Stephen Sondheim, which is available online.