The Future Of Air Travel : 1A There are a lot of complaints that airlines aren't providing refunds when they should, says Niraj Chokshi, who covers the business of transportation for The New York Times.

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The Future Of Air Travel

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The Future Of Air Travel

1A

The Future Of Air Travel

The Future Of Air Travel

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/853963929/854072452" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Two grounded American Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 are seen parked in Miami, Florida. Joe Raedle/Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Two grounded American Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 are seen parked in Miami, Florida.

Joe Raedle/Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Airlines were soaring towards record travel numbers at the start of this year. Then, COVID-19 hit like a lightning bolt.

The average number of passengers on a domestic flight is now about 17. That's about a single passenger per row. And American taxpayers gave U.S. airlines a $50 billion bailout to help pull the industry out of a financial nose-dive. Will that be enough?

And what will the future of air travel look like in a post-pandemic world?

Joining us to talk about these questions and more are New York Times reporter Niraj Chokshi, Josh Earnest, chief communications officer for United Airlines and Sara Nelson, president of the Association of Flight Attendants—a union representing 50,000 flight attendants.

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