Is The Coronavirus Mutating? Yes. What A Mutation Means : Short Wave Ed Yong of The Atlantic explains how a viral article led to headlines about a possible coronavirus mutation. All viruses mutate — it doesn't necessarily mean the virus has developed into a more dangerous "strain."

Read Ed's recent piece on coronavirus mutations here, and more of his reporting on the pandemic here.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.
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The Coronavirus Is Mutating. Here's What That Means.

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The Coronavirus Is Mutating. Here's What That Means.

The Coronavirus Is Mutating. Here's What That Means.

The Coronavirus Is Mutating. Here's What That Means.

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/854389244/855534712" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This undated handout photo from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows a microscopic view of the Coronavirus at the CDC in Atlanta, Georgia. Getty Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images/Getty Images

This undated handout photo from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows a microscopic view of the Coronavirus at the CDC in Atlanta, Georgia.

Getty Images/Getty Images

Ed Yong of The Atlantic explains how a viral article led to headlines about a possible coronavirus mutation. All viruses mutate — it doesn't necessarily mean the virus has developed into a more dangerous "strain."

Read Ed's recent piece on coronavirus mutations here, and more of his reporting on the pandemic here.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brent Baughman, fact-checked by Emily Vaughn, and edited by Geoff Brumfiel.