Apple, Google On Contact Tracing; Should Kids Return To School? Career government scientist-turned-whistleblower Rick Bright testified before Congress Thursday that without a stronger federal response to the coronavirus, 2020 could be the "darkest winter in modern history."

Schools might not open everywhere in the fall, but some experts say keeping kids home is a health risk, too.

Apple and Google want to develop technology to track the spread of COVID-19 while protecting individuals' privacy, while some states like North Dakota are developing their own apps.

Plus, tips on social distancing from someone who's been doing it for 50 years: Billy Barr's movie recommendations spreadsheet.

Listen to the NPR Politics Podcast's recap of today's hearing on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.

Send your remembrance of a loved one to embedded@npr.org.

Find and support your local public radio station

Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter
NPR logo

Whistleblower: U.S. Lost Valuable Time, Warns Of 'Darkest Winter In Modern History'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/856008552/856503415" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Whistleblower: U.S. Lost Valuable Time, Warns Of 'Darkest Winter In Modern History'

Whistleblower: U.S. Lost Valuable Time, Warns Of 'Darkest Winter In Modern History'

Whistleblower: U.S. Lost Valuable Time, Warns Of 'Darkest Winter In Modern History'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/856008552/856503415" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rick Bright filed a whistleblower complaint after he was removed from his post as head of the agency charged with developing a vaccine against coronavirus. He said he was removed for opposing the use of malaria drugs chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine as treatments for the coronavirus. Those drugs were promoted by President Donald Trump despite little scientific evidence for their efficacy. Greg Nash/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Greg Nash/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Rick Bright filed a whistleblower complaint after he was removed from his post as head of the agency charged with developing a vaccine against coronavirus. He said he was removed for opposing the use of malaria drugs chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine as treatments for the coronavirus. Those drugs were promoted by President Donald Trump despite little scientific evidence for their efficacy.

Greg Nash/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Career government scientist-turned-whistleblower Rick Bright testified before Congress Thursday that without a stronger federal response to the coronavirus, 2020 could be the "darkest winter in modern history."

Schools might not open everywhere in the fall, but some experts say keeping kids home is a health risk, too.

Apple and Google want to develop technology to track the spread of COVID-19 while protecting individuals' privacy, while some states like North Dakota are developing their own apps.

Plus, tips on social distancing from someone who's been doing it for 50 years: Billy Barr's movie recommendations spreadsheet.

Listen to the NPR Politics Podcast's recap of today's hearing on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.

Send your remembrance of a loved one to embedded@npr.org.

Find and support your local public radio station

Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter

This episode was produced by Gabriela Saldivia, Anne Li and Brent Baughman, and edited by Beth Donovan.