What We Might Learn From The 1918 Flu Pandemic John Barry's 2004 book about the 1918 influenza pandemic is a current bestseller. Barry talks about the parallels that are relevant to today's COVID-19 crisis. In both cases, he says, "the outbreak was trivialized for a long time." Also, we remember eccentric pop music figure Ian Whitcomb. Many people knew him for his 1965 novelty song 'You Turn Me On,' which was a top 10 hit. He died last month at 78.

And classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz shares what he's been listening to during these difficult times.
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What We Might Learn From The 1918 Flu Pandemic

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What We Might Learn From The 1918 Flu Pandemic

What We Might Learn From The 1918 Flu Pandemic

What We Might Learn From The 1918 Flu Pandemic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/856082009/856270363" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

John Barry's 2004 book about the 1918 influenza pandemic is a current bestseller. Barry talks about the parallels that are relevant to today's COVID-19 crisis. In both cases, he says, "the outbreak was trivialized for a long time." Also, we remember eccentric pop music figure Ian Whitcomb. Many people knew him for his 1965 novelty song 'You Turn Me On,' which was a top 10 hit. He died last month at 78.

And classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz shares what he's been listening to during these difficult times.