The Pandemic's Impact On The Latino Community : Alt.Latino This week, we host a roundtable with reporters covering the coronavirus and how infections have adversely impacted communities of color in the U.S.
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The Pandemic's Impact On The Latino Community

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The Pandemic's Impact On The Latino Community

The Pandemic's Impact On The Latino Community

The Pandemic's Impact On The Latino Community

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Undocumented workers are fighting for personal protection equipment as they perform work categorized as "essential" by the federal government. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Undocumented workers are fighting for personal protection equipment as they perform work categorized as "essential" by the federal government.

Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Occasionally, Alt.Latino looks beyond the world of music, though the intersection of the pandemic, politics and the arts is never far from mind. This week, we host a roundtable with reporters covering the coronavirus and how infections have adversely impacted communities of color in the U.S.

Dianne Solis is a Senior Writer for the Dallas Morning News who normally covers immigration for the paper. She tells us about the spread of the coronavirus in immigration detention centers in Texas.

We're going to hear from my NPR colleague Marisa Peñaloza. She's been reporting on the plight of undocumented workers and their fight for personal protection equipment and economic aid when they can't do the work that has been categorized as "essential" by the federal government.

When the pandemic started, many Latinos from the U.S. and Latin American countries were in Europe. For Palabra, a publication run by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, Barbara Estrada spoke to the folks who chose to stay there and ride it out.

Dallas Morning News reporter Alfredo Corchado recently wrote an editorial for the New York Times op-ed section that called for changes to our immigration laws. These changes could have a positive impact on food chains and manufacturing supply routes, which could contribute to the economic recovery of not just the U.S. but the entire North American region.

This will not be the last time we change our focus from music to the pandemic and we hope you embrace this coverage as intimately as you do our musical offerings. Be careful out there, gente. — Felix Contreras