Life Changed By Coronavirus : It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders Ever since the coronavirus pandemic began, we've become more accustomed to life closing down than opening up. But for many, putting life on pause isn't an option. This week, Sam talks to people whose lives were thrown off course, but who scrambled to keep doing what they were doing. A home health aide talks about the risk she now takes to do her work. A political organizer explains how door knocking and canvassing had to go digital. And an international student is determined to stay in the United States, despite losing her classes, her housing, and her job.
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The Show Must Go On

The Show Must Go On

The Show Must Go On

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Residents of the Living Memory Care and assisted living home of Vadnais Heights have a heroes work here sign put up for the health care workers that take care of them every day. (Photo by: Michael Siluk) Michael Siluk/Education Images/Universal Image hide caption

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Michael Siluk/Education Images/Universal Image

Residents of the Living Memory Care and assisted living home of Vadnais Heights have a heroes work here sign put up for the health care workers that take care of them every day. (Photo by: Michael Siluk)

Michael Siluk/Education Images/Universal Image

Ever since the coronavirus pandemic began, we've become more accustomed to life closing down than opening up. But for many, putting life on pause isn't an option. This week, Sam talks to people whose lives were thrown off course, but who scrambled to keep doing what they were doing. Irene Hunt, a home health aide, talks about the risk she now takes to do her work. Then, Megan Romero, a political organizer, explains how door knocking and canvassing had to go digital. And international student Martha Tejeda Montes tells Sam she's determined to stay in the United States, despite losing her classes, her housing, and her job.

'It's Been a Minute' is produced by Jinae West, Anjuli Sastry, Andrea Gutierrez and Hafsa Fathima. Our editor is Jordana Hochman. Our director of programming is Steve Nelson. You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin.