British Man Invents 'Cuddle Curtain' For Socially Distant Hugs With Grandma The coronavirus hasn't stopped a 29-year-old British man from hugging his grandmother. He invented the Cuddle Curtain – a shower curtain with plastic sleeves – so she can hug him whenever she wants.
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British Man Invents 'Cuddle Curtain' For Socially Distant Hugs With Grandma

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British Man Invents 'Cuddle Curtain' For Socially Distant Hugs With Grandma

British Man Invents 'Cuddle Curtain' For Socially Distant Hugs With Grandma

British Man Invents 'Cuddle Curtain' For Socially Distant Hugs With Grandma

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/859261908/859285579" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The coronavirus hasn't stopped a 29-year-old British man from hugging his grandmother. He invented the Cuddle Curtain – a shower curtain with plastic sleeves – so she can hug him whenever she wants.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Noel King. Yes, the coronavirus has stopped us from giving each other hugs. A 29-year-old British man missed hugging his grandma so much that he invented a solution, a Cuddle Curtain. There are videos. They show a transparent shower curtain with two plastic sleeves hanging down each side. The grandma reaches into the sleeves for a hug, and she holds on for a long time. So, grandma, grandson, keep calm and cuddle on.

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