Science Movie Club: The Search For Intelligent Life In 'Contact' Yes, there actually are astronomers looking for intelligent life in space. The 1997 film adaptation of Carl Sagan's 'Contact' got a lot of things right ... and a few things wrong. Radio astronomer Summer Ash, an education specialist with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, breaks down the science in the film.
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Science Movie Club: 'Contact'

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Science Movie Club: 'Contact'

Science Movie Club: 'Contact'

Science Movie Club: 'Contact'

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Much of the movie 'Contact' was filmed at the Very Large Array in New Mexico. Erin Slonaker/Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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Erin Slonaker/Moment Editorial/Getty Images

Much of the movie 'Contact' was filmed at the Very Large Array in New Mexico.

Erin Slonaker/Moment Editorial/Getty Images

Yes, there actually are astronomers looking for intelligent life in space. The 1997 film adaptation of Carl Sagan's 'Contact' got a lot of things right ... and a few things wrong. Radio astronomer Summer Ash, an education specialist with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, breaks down the science in the film.

Have ideas for our next installment of the Science Movie Club? Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brit Hanson, edited by Viet Le and fact-checked by Emily Vaughn.