Optimism For A Vaccine, State Unemployment Delays A new analysis from Columbia University says that roughly 36,000 people could've been saved if the United States had started social distancing just one week earlier. But that all hinges on whether people would have been willing to stay home.

Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter

Research with mice, guinea pigs and monkeys is making scientists increasingly optimistic about the chances for developing a COVID-19 vaccine. Three studies released Wednesday show promising results after the animals received experimental vaccines. But public health success will require global cooperation.

Meanwhile, state unemployment agencies are feeling the pinch as they try to keep up with unparalleled demand for their services.

And as bordering towns begin to ease stay-at-home restrictions, the logistics around reopening neighboring areas is leading to quite a bit of confusion.

Plus, sometimes you just need a hug. And if you're isolating alone, TikTok star Tabitha Brown has got you covered with comfort content to help you feel loved.
NPR logo

Optimism For A Vaccine; Strapped Unemployment Offices Leave Many Waiting

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/860018030/860574532" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Optimism For A Vaccine; Strapped Unemployment Offices Leave Many Waiting

Optimism For A Vaccine; Strapped Unemployment Offices Leave Many Waiting

Optimism For A Vaccine; Strapped Unemployment Offices Leave Many Waiting

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/860018030/860574532" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A sign "Temporarily Closed" is seen in front of a store amid the coronavirus pandemic on May 14, 2020 in Arlington, Virginia. - Another 3 million people filed initial unemployment claims last week on a seasonally adjusted basis, according to the Department of Labor. OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images

A sign "Temporarily Closed" is seen in front of a store amid the coronavirus pandemic on May 14, 2020 in Arlington, Virginia. - Another 3 million people filed initial unemployment claims last week on a seasonally adjusted basis, according to the Department of Labor.

OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images

A new analysis from Columbia University says that roughly 36,000 people could've been saved if the United States had started social distancing just one week earlier. But that all hinges on whether people would have been willing to stay home.

Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter

Research with mice, guinea pigs and monkeys is making scientists increasingly optimistic about the chances for developing a COVID-19 vaccine. Three studies released Wednesday show promising results after the animals received experimental vaccines. But public health success will require global cooperation.

Meanwhile, state unemployment agencies are feeling the pinch as they try to keep up with unparalleled demand for their services.

And as bordering towns begin to ease stay-at-home restrictions, the logistics around reopening neighboring areas is leading to quite a bit of confusion.

Plus, sometimes you just need a hug. And if you're isolating alone, TikTok star Tabitha Brown has got you covered with comfort content to help you feel loved.

This episode was produced by Emily Alfin Johnson, Anne Li and Brent Baughman, and edited by Beth Donovan.