Fauci Says A Vaccine Is Possible By The End Of The Year Earlier this week, an experimental coronavirus vaccine showed promise. But, for the moment, the full data from that research hasn't been released.

Friday morning, Dr. Anthony Fauci told NPR he's seen the data and it looks "quite promising." According to Fauci, barring any setbacks, the US is on track to have a vaccine by early next year.

Millions of Americans are turning to food banks to help feed their families during the pandemic. A new federal program pays farmers who've lost restaurant and school business to donate the excess to community organizations. But even the people in charge of these organizations say direct cash assistance is a better way to feed Americans in need.

A few months ago, before the lock downs, nearly 3,000 paratroopers of the 82nd Airborne Division left on a short-notice deployment to the Middle East. The 82nd is coming back is being welcomed back to a changed nation and a changed military.

Plus, about 180 people are hunkered down together in a Jerusalem hotel, recovering from COVID-19. Patients from all walks of life — Israelis, Palestinians, religious, secular groups that don't usually mix — are all getting along. Listen to the full Rough Translation podcast "Hotel Corona."

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Fauci Optimistic On Vaccine; What's Different About Military Homecomings

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Fauci Optimistic On Vaccine; What's Different About Military Homecomings

Fauci Optimistic On Vaccine; What's Different About Military Homecomings

Fauci Optimistic On Vaccine; What's Different About Military Homecomings

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/860542385/861251745" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This handout picture released by the US Army shows U.S. Army Paratroopers assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, deploy from Pope Army Airfield, North Carolina, on January 1, 2020. The 82nd Airborne Division was activated and deployed earlier this year and returned to North Carolina in the midst of the cornavirus pandemic. CAPT. ROBYN HAAKE/US ARMY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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CAPT. ROBYN HAAKE/US ARMY/AFP via Getty Images

This handout picture released by the US Army shows U.S. Army Paratroopers assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, deploy from Pope Army Airfield, North Carolina, on January 1, 2020. The 82nd Airborne Division was activated and deployed earlier this year and returned to North Carolina in the midst of the cornavirus pandemic.

CAPT. ROBYN HAAKE/US ARMY/AFP via Getty Images

Earlier this week, an experimental coronavirus vaccine showed promise. But, for the moment, the full data from that research hasn't been released.

Friday morning, Dr. Anthony Fauci told NPR he's seen the data and it looks "quite promising." According to Fauci, barring any setbacks, the US is on track to have a vaccine by early next year.

Millions of Americans are turning to food banks to help feed their families during the pandemic. A new federal program pays farmers who've lost restaurant and school business to donate the excess to community organizations. But even the people in charge of these organizations say direct cash assistance is a better way to feed Americans in need.

A few months ago, before the lock downs, nearly 3,000 paratroopers of the 82nd Airborne Division left on a short-notice deployment to the Middle East. The 82nd is coming back is being welcomed back to a changed nation and a changed military.

Plus, about 180 people are hunkered down together in a Jerusalem hotel, recovering from COVID-19. Patients from all walks of life — Israelis, Palestinians, religious, secular groups that don't usually mix — are all getting along. Listen to the full Rough Translation podcast "Hotel Corona."

Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter
Find and support your local public radio station

This episode was produced by Emily Alfin Johnson, Anne Li and Brent Baughman, and edited by Beth Donovan.