Without Fans, Sports Stadiums Are Pretty Quiet During The Pandemic A Japanese firm created an app that lets fans follow the match as they would on TV, and cheer or boo players through their phones. Their voices are then played in the stadium through loudspeakers.
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Without Fans, Sports Stadiums Are Pretty Quiet During The Pandemic

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Without Fans, Sports Stadiums Are Pretty Quiet During The Pandemic

Without Fans, Sports Stadiums Are Pretty Quiet During The Pandemic

Without Fans, Sports Stadiums Are Pretty Quiet During The Pandemic

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/864699452/864699453" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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A Japanese firm created an app that lets fans follow the match as they would on TV, and cheer or boo players through their phones. Their voices are then played in the stadium through loudspeakers.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. Sports stadiums without fans aren't much fun. But during the pandemic, silent games have become the norm in many countries, so a Japanese firm created a smartphone app that lets fans follow the match as they would on TV and then cheer or boo at players through their phones. Their voices are then played across the stadium in real time through the loudspeakers. Users still won't be able to yell at referees, but at least they'll feel more like part of the game.

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