Code Switch: A Decade Of Watching Black People Die : Short Wave The last few weeks have been filled with devastating news — stories about the police killing black people. So today, we're turning the mic over to our colleagues at NPR's Code Switch. Now, as always, they're doing really important work covering race and identity in the United States. In this episode, they spoke with Jamil Smith, who wrote the essay "What Does Seeing Black Men Die Do For You?" for The New Republic. Thank you for listening.
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Code Switch: A Decade Of Watching Black People Die

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Code Switch: A Decade Of Watching Black People Die

Code Switch: A Decade Of Watching Black People Die

Code Switch: A Decade Of Watching Black People Die

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/868025780/871155802" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The rate at which black Americans are killed by police is more than twice as high as the rate for white Americans. This is a non-comprehensive list of deaths at the hands of police in the U.S. since Eric Garner's death in July 2014. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

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LA Johnson/NPR

The rate at which black Americans are killed by police is more than twice as high as the rate for white Americans. This is a non-comprehensive list of deaths at the hands of police in the U.S. since Eric Garner's death in July 2014.

LA Johnson/NPR

The last few weeks have been filled with devastating news — stories about the police killing black people.

So, today, we're turning the mic over to our colleagues at NPR's Code Switch. In this episode, they spoke with Jamil Smith. He's a senior writer at Rolling Stone and in 2015, he wrote the essay "What Does Seeing Black Men Die Do For You?" for The New Republic.

Now, as always, Code Switch is doing really important work covering race and identity in the United States. Check out their full Code Switch archive.