Rethinking The Migration Of All Living Things : Fresh Air When living things cross into new territory, they are often viewed as threats. But science writer Sonia Shah, who has written a new book — 'The Next Great Migration' — says the "invaders" are just following biology. Shah talks about the migration of people, animals and plants (especially due to climate change), and our misconceptions about "belonging."
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Rethinking The Migration Of All Living Things

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Rethinking The Migration Of All Living Things

Rethinking The Migration Of All Living Things

Rethinking The Migration Of All Living Things

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/868163560/885946117" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

When living things cross into new territory, they are often viewed as threats. But science writer Sonia Shah, who has written a new book — 'The Next Great Migration' — says the "invaders" are just following biology. Shah talks about the migration of people, animals and plants (especially due to climate change), and our misconceptions about "belonging."