D.C. Protesters Make Noise In Centuries-Old Protest Form While some march and others sing, these D.C. residents are banging pots and pans – a form of protest called cacerolazo – to speak against the death of George Floyd.
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D.C. Protesters Make Noise In Centuries-Old Protest Form

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D.C. Protesters Make Noise In Centuries-Old Protest Form

D.C. Protesters Make Noise In Centuries-Old Protest Form

D.C. Protesters Make Noise In Centuries-Old Protest Form

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/868469828/868469829" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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While some march and others sing, these D.C. residents are banging pots and pans – a form of protest called cacerolazo – to speak against the death of George Floyd.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Protests across this country have taken many forms. Some people march in the streets, others sing. A few do this.

(SOUNDBITE OF POTS AND PANS CLANGING)

INSKEEP: People in Washington, D.C., banged on pots and pans last night during the city's curfew. Washington Post writer Ishaan Tharoor shared that video. Now, when you protest by making loud noise, it is called a cacerolazo, and it's a form of protest that is centuries old.

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