How To Identify Misinformation (And Disinformation) About The Protests : 1A "Misinformation is often optimized to appeal to our emotions," The News Literacy Project's Peter Adams says. "It deeply resonates with our values and most sacred beliefs, and that causes us to act too quickly."

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.
NPR logo

How To Identify Misinformation (And Disinformation) About The Protests

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/869896643/869940094" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
How To Identify Misinformation (And Disinformation) About The Protests

1A

How To Identify Misinformation (And Disinformation) About The Protests

How To Identify Misinformation (And Disinformation) About The Protests

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/869896643/869940094" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

War room leader for Brazil elections Lexi Sturdy works in Facebook's "War Room," during a media demonstration in Menlo Park, California. NOAH BERGER/NOAH BERGER/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
NOAH BERGER/NOAH BERGER/AFP via Getty Images

War room leader for Brazil elections Lexi Sturdy works in Facebook's "War Room," during a media demonstration in Menlo Park, California.

NOAH BERGER/NOAH BERGER/AFP via Getty Images

In the 1960s, as news of protests broke, Americans were glued to their television screens. Now, when something significant happens, many people open their Twitter, Facebook or Instagram feed.

An engaged democracy requires information. But what effect does it have when some of the information citizens receive is false?

Bad actors have learned how to manipulate social media to spread misinformation. But sometimes it's well-meaning people who retweet and repost things that are simply not true.

We talked about disinformation and misinformation online and how it creates and perpetuates separate narratives for how we understand what is going on in the world.

Peter Adams, senior vice president of education with the News Literacy Project, Jane Lytvynenko, senior reporter covering disinformation and security for BuzzFeed News, Kevin Roose, tech columnist for The New York Times and Ben Collins, tech writer for NBC News joined us to talk about it.

Like what you hear? Find more of our programs online.