The Business Of Antibody Tests : The Indicator from Planet Money Companies all over the world are jockeying for position in the lucrative COVID-19 antibody testing market, but are quality standards getting lost in the shuffle?
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The Business Of Antibody Tests

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The Business Of Antibody Tests

The Business Of Antibody Tests

The Business Of Antibody Tests

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/870130109/870137705" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images
A health worker process for COVID-19 antibodies after getting the blood from the patient at the the Diagnostic and Wellness Center on May 5, 2020, in Torrance, California. - (Photo by VALERIE MACON / AFP) (Photo by VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images)
VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images

With all the uncertainty surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic, people everywhere are desperate for anything that can give them some measure of certainty. The latest thing is coronavirus antibody tests, which purport to be able to tell you if you've been exposed to the virus and therefore might have immunity to it. The Food and Drug Administration deemed these tests to be so important that it streamlined its normal process for approving them, allowing dozens of companies to flood the market with new antibody tests. But with the science around these tests still in its infancy, and experts disagreeing about their usefulness, some worry that this antibody gold rush may be misleading consumers.

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