The News Roundup For June 5, 2020 : 1A Hundreds of thousands around the world mourned George Floyd and protested racism and police brutality. President Trump threatened to send the military to states. And nations around the world reopen, while some are still reporting record cases of COVID-19.

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The News Roundup For June 5, 2020

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The News Roundup For June 5, 2020

1A

The News Roundup For June 5, 2020

The News Roundup For June 5, 2020

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/870908532/871006101" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A demonstrator holds up a placard reading 'Black Lives Matter' in Toulouse, France, during a protest against police violence and in memory of late US citizen George Floyd as well as French citizen Adama Traore. LIONEL BONAVENTURE/LIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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LIONEL BONAVENTURE/LIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP via Getty Images

A demonstrator holds up a placard reading 'Black Lives Matter' in Toulouse, France, during a protest against police violence and in memory of late US citizen George Floyd as well as French citizen Adama Traore.

LIONEL BONAVENTURE/LIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP via Getty Images

Protesters filled streets, parks and public spaces in every state this week. Most were peaceful.

Tens of thousands turned out in George Floyd's hometown of Houston, while thousands of others gathered near the White House.

And President Donald Trump told American states that if they didn't call in the National Guard, he would send troops. That message came right before he used tear gas to disperse peaceful protesters—so he could hold a photo op at a nearby church.

And in Georgia, a witness came forward with startling testimony in the case of Ahmaud Arbery.

On the other side of the world, an Australian court blocked protesters from holding another Black Lives Matter rally in Sydney.

And the world-famous Vienna Philharmonic is about to give its first post-lockdown concert. The music? Beethoven's 5th Symphony.

Meanwhile, Indonesia opened its mosques and other places of worship for the first time in three months, amid remaining concerns from health experts about the COVID-19 pandemic.

For our conversation about domestic news, we spoke with Eugene Scott, political reporter for The Washington Post Anita Kumar, White House correspondent and associate editor for Politico and Daniel Newhauser, freelance journalist and former senior political reporter at Vice News.

Then for our international roundup, we spoke with Hayes Brown, co-host of BuzzFeed's podcast "News O'Clock," Indira Lakshmanan, senior executive editor for National Geographic and Courtney Kube, national security and military reporter for NBC News.

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