Behind The Hits: An Inside Look At Capitol Studios In Los Angeles : World Cafe : World Cafe Words and Music from WXPN From Nat King Cole and Frank Sinatra to Bonnie Raitt and Paul McCartney, here's how the studios at Capitol Records in Los Angeles influence artists' sound.

Explore Decades Of Hits Inside Capitol Studios

Explore Decades Of Hits Inside Capitol Studios

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Inside Capitol Records Studio A, The Telefunken U47 microphone used by Frank Sinatra and many since. Kimberly Junod/WXPN hide caption

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Kimberly Junod/WXPN

Inside Capitol Records Studio A, The Telefunken U47 microphone used by Frank Sinatra and many since.

Kimberly Junod/WXPN

Playlist

"Unforgettable" (Nat King Cole)

"The Joker" (The Steve Miller Band)

"Orange" (Nelson Riddle)

"All the Way" (Frank Sinatra)

"Cinco Robles (Five Oaks)" (Les Paul and Mary Ford)

"My Valentine" (Paul McCartney)

"Drops of Jupiter" (Train)

What do these musicians — Nat King Cole, Britney Spears, The Beach Boys, John Mayer, Bonnie Raitt, Paul McCartney and Frank Sinatra — all have in common? They are just a small portion in the long list of iconic artists who have recorded at Capitol Studios. For our Sense of Place visit to Los Angeles, World Cafe contributing host Kallao went inside the landmark building in Hollywood where so many classic albums have been made. You know the one; it looks like a stack of records. There are several rooms inside where an engineer might capture a song or master an album, but Kallao got to sit down in Studio B with someone who knows it inside and out. Senior Recording Engineer, Steve Genewick. Tune in to today's interview to get an inside look at Capitol Studios.

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