Patent Racism : Planet Money Violence, including racist attacks, stifles innovation and the economy. Dr. Lisa Cook proved how. It took 10 years to be heard. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.
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Patent Racism

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Patent Racism

Patent Racism

Patent Racism

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In the lab with George Washington Carver, a prominent soil scientist and inventor of the early 20th Century Bettmann/Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

In the lab with George Washington Carver, a prominent soil scientist and inventor of the early 20th Century

Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

Dr. Lisa Cook found a blindspot in a big theory on innovation: the idea that if we just make strong patent laws, innovation will come. True for some, not true for others.

Her research has huge implications for Black Americans — and for the wealth of entire countries. But convincing her colleagues took a lot more than data.

Music: "Cold Heart" and "Seismic Encounter."

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Correction June 22, 2020

A previous version of this story cited the wrong economist calling Dr. Cook's work an original idea that should be published. It was Milton Friedman, not Martin Feldstein.