Asymptomatic Vs Presymptomatic: How The Virus Spreads : Short Wave It's called asymptomatic spread. Recently a scientist with the World Health Organization created confusion when she seemed to suggest it was "very rare." It's not, as the WHO attempted to clarify.

NPR science reporter Pien Huang explains what scientists know about asymptomatic spread, and what might have caused the WHO's mixed messages.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.
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How Many People Transmit The Coronavirus Without Ever Feeling Sick?

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How Many People Transmit The Coronavirus Without Ever Feeling Sick?

How Many People Transmit The Coronavirus Without Ever Feeling Sick?

How Many People Transmit The Coronavirus Without Ever Feeling Sick?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/877795797/878923041" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

World Health Organization Technical Lead Maria Van Kerkhove speaks during a daily press briefing on the coronavirus at the WHO headquarters in Geneva. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images

World Health Organization Technical Lead Maria Van Kerkhove speaks during a daily press briefing on the coronavirus at the WHO headquarters in Geneva.

Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images

It's called asymptomatic spread. Recently a scientist with the World Health Organization created confusion when she seemed to suggest it was "very rare." It's not, as the WHO attempted to clarify.

NPR science reporter Pien Huang explains what scientists know about asymptomatic spread, and what might have caused the WHO's mixed messages.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brent Baughman, edited by Viet Le, and fact checked by Maddie Sofia.