A Decision On DACA + How To Talk About Race With Kids : 1A Teaching your kids to be colorblind isn't the right approach. "We do have color. We do see color," Professor Bettina Love tells us. "We have to help folks understand that to become antiracist is to recognize these things."

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

1A

A Decision On DACA + How To Talk About Race With Kids

A Decision On DACA + How To Talk About Race With Kids

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/880377809/880523698" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) plaintiffs come out of court as immigration rights activists hold a rally in front of the US Supreme Court on November 12, 2019, following arguments about ending the Obama-era program. SAUL LOEB/SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
SAUL LOEB/SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) plaintiffs come out of court as immigration rights activists hold a rally in front of the US Supreme Court on November 12, 2019, following arguments about ending the Obama-era program.

SAUL LOEB/SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court ruled against the Trump administration and upheld the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. The court said the administration's decision to end the program was "arbitrary and capricious."

But it left the door open for the Trump administration to end the program in other ways.

First, Garrett Epps, professor of law at the University of Baltimore, joined us to break the vote down.

Then, we talk about a conversation that every parent needs to have with their children. We're talking about race.

For Black parents, discussing race and racism isn't a choice. But many white children can go their entire childhoods without ever having a real conversation about racism. That may be because white adults can avoid talking about race if they want to, while Black adults cannot.

In the aftermath of the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tamir Rice, Atatiana Jefferson and many others who have died violently at the hands of police officers, perhaps this conversation has never been more tough. But any parent knows that kids are watching and they see more than we want them to.

Having to grapple with the possibility of violence at such a young age can have lasting impacts on a child's mind. 1A correspondent Sasha-Ann Simons spoke with some young protesters and psychologist Rheeda Walker to find out what those impacts are.

And, for more insight into this issue, we were joined by Vashti Harrison, author and illustrator of books like "Little Leaders: Bold Women in Black History" and "Little Legends: Exceptional Men in Black History," Dr. Nia Heard-Garris, pediatrician and researcher at the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago and Northwestern University and Professor Bettina Love, professor of educational theory and practice at the University of Georgia.

Like what you hear? Find more of our programs online.