As COVID-19 Cases Rise, Thousands Gather Indoors In Tulsa : Consider This from NPR COVID-19 cases are on the rise in some states — and more testing isn't the only explanation.

Find out how cases are in your community.

Today is Juneteenth. On this day in 1865, U.S. Army troops landed in Galveston, Texas to tell some of the last enslaved Americans they were free. More American businesses are recognizing the holiday this year.

President Trump was planning on holding a rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma today. Instead, thousands will be gathering to see the President tomorrow — indoors. And as NPR's Tamera Keith reports, public health officials aren't thrilled.

Plus, Germany has been able to slow the spread of the coronavirus with the help of an army of contact tracers working around the clock. NPR's Rob Schmitz has more.

Yesterday, the Supreme Court upheld Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals (DACA). NPR's Code Switch spoke with one of the plaintiffs in the case about how she's processing the news.You can find Code Switch on Spotify, Apple Podcasts and NPR One.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
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The President's Indoor Rally; Rise In Cases Not Explained By More Testing

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The President's Indoor Rally; Rise In Cases Not Explained By More Testing

The President's Indoor Rally; Rise In Cases Not Explained By More Testing

The President's Indoor Rally; Rise In Cases Not Explained By More Testing

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/880827489/881025760" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump sleep in the early morning while lined up to attend the Trump's campaign rally near the BOK Center, site of tomorrow's rally, June 19, 2020 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Trump is scheduled to hold his first political rally since the start of the coronavirus pandemic at the BOK Center on Saturday while infection rates in the state of Oklahoma continue to rise. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump sleep in the early morning while lined up to attend the Trump's campaign rally near the BOK Center, site of tomorrow's rally, June 19, 2020 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Trump is scheduled to hold his first political rally since the start of the coronavirus pandemic at the BOK Center on Saturday while infection rates in the state of Oklahoma continue to rise.

Win McNamee/Getty Images

This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.

COVID-19 cases are on the rise in some states — and more testing isn't the only explanation.

Find out how cases are in your community.

Today is Juneteenth. On this day in 1865, U.S. Army troops landed in Galveston, Texas to tell some of the last enslaved Americans they were free. More American businesses are recognizing the holiday this year.

President Trump was planning on holding a rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma today. Instead, thousands will be gathering to see the President tomorrow — indoors. And as NPR's Tamera Keith reports, public health officials aren't thrilled.

Plus, Germany has been able to slow the spread of the coronavirus with the help of an army of contact tracers working around the clock. NPR's Rob Schmitz has more.

Yesterday, the Supreme Court upheld Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals (DACA). NPR's Code Switch spoke with one of the plaintiffs in the case about how she's processing the news.You can find Code Switch on Spotify, Apple Podcasts and NPR One.

Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter.

Find and support your local public radio station.

This episode was produced by Annie Li, Emily Alfin Johnson, Lee Hale and Brent Baughman, and edited by Beth Donovan.