Money And Justice : Planet Money Money and social change. We talk policing, nonprofits, reparations, and the awkwardness of brands getting woke. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.
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Money And Justice

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Money And Justice

Money And Justice

Money And Justice

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/881067204/881456888" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A protester in Brooklyn with a face mask saying Defund Police, June 7 2020. Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images

A protester in Brooklyn with a face mask saying Defund Police, June 7 2020.

Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images

When the protests erupted, little nonprofits like the Brooklyn Community Bail Fund were so overwhelmed with donations they had to stop taking them entirely. Meanwhile, other foundations took money they might not have needed.

We try to find out exactly what a "defunded" police department might look like, if it exists at all. We also talk with Professor William A. "Sandy" Darity Jr. about reparations, and why he thinks there is a right number, and why it's a minimum of $10 trillion. And we chat with It's Been A Minute host Sam Sanders about how cringey it can be when corporations try to do one thing. We're clapping, but awkwardly.

Music: "Lose Yo Job," "Stand-Up," "Le Nitty Gritty," "Hubcap Harp," and "Spinning Piano."

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Correction June 21, 2020

In this report, we incorrectly refer to the Bureau of Justice Statistics as the Bureau of Justice Services.