Reckoning With Racist Brands : 1A "The CEOs and the leaders at these companies recognize that this is a revolution... young people are taking to the streets and brands matter," says marketing expert Mike Jackson.

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Reckoning With Racist Brands

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Reckoning With Racist Brands

1A

Reckoning With Racist Brands

Reckoning With Racist Brands

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Boxes of Aunt Jemima pancake mix are seen on a store shelf on June 17, 2020 in Washington, DC. EVA HAMBACH/EVA HAMBACH/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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EVA HAMBACH/EVA HAMBACH/AFP via Getty Images

Boxes of Aunt Jemima pancake mix are seen on a store shelf on June 17, 2020 in Washington, DC.

EVA HAMBACH/EVA HAMBACH/AFP via Getty Images

It might seem that Confederate statues are coming down and brand names and logos with racist origins are being pulled. It might seem like it's all happening quickly.

But the truth is, Americans have protested those statues since they went up, and the offensive brand logos have been a cause for concern for decades.

You might be surprised by some of the familiar names and faces that have roots in slavery and minstrelsy. Many consumers and critics are asking why these symbols have endured for more than 155 years after the Civil War ended.

We talk about these issues with Rita Roberts, professor of history and Africana Studies at Scripps College; Jason Chambers, associate professor of advertising at the University of Illinois; and Mike Jackson, founder of 2050 Marketing.

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