Panel Questions Dial back the dialogue.
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Panel Questions

Panel Questions

Panel Questions

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Dial back the dialogue.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Right now, panel, it is time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Mo, Hollywood is finally allowing filming to resume this week, but there are new rules. Among them, actors are being instructed to do what as little as possible while filming?

MO ROCCA: Well, Peter, before I answer, can I share some personal news with everyone?

SAGAL: You may, Mo.

ROCCA: Earlier today, I had an endoscopy and a colonoscopy. It's what's known in TV as a two-camera shoot.

(LAUGHTER)

ROCCA: And that's why I sound a little groggy - because of the camera they put down my throat.

SAGAL: Yeah.

HARI KONDABOLU: Oh, no.

ROCCA: But as for the prep for the colonoscopy, I just feel like I could fly. Like, I feel so - I feel like Nureyev. Like, I feel like I could just, like, just leap across Sixth Avenue.

SAGAL: I know. Now, what's interesting...

FAITH SALIE: You are levitating.

SAGAL: You had them both at once. Did the cameras meet in the middle and sort of start filming each other?

ROCCA: That would be a union violation.

SAGAL: I understand. But you're doing the show today, then, Mo, still on colonoscopy drugs...

ROCCA: Right.

SAGAL: ...Which is interesting.

ROCCA: Yeah. No, I know it's interesting. It's - yeah, it can be part of a question based on some sort of research later on - like, in a few weeks.

KONDABOLU: (Laughter).

SALIE: Wait, Mo, your voice does sound a little - you have, like, a little Dr. Fauci kind of scratchy' voice today.

ROCCA: Oh, good. I like that.

SAGAL: Yeah.

ROCCA: I like that. Good. OK. I've got some Fauci going on. Yeah.

SAGAL: All right. Are you ready to answer a question, though, Mo? I appreciate the warning that you've been...

ROCCA: Oh, sure. I just wanted...

SAGAL: ...Scoped.

ROCCA: I thought this would be a special WAIT WAIT... moment.

SAGAL: Mo, Hollywood is finally allowing filming to resume this week, but there are new rules. Among them, actors are being instructed to do what as little as possible while filming?

ROCCA: Exhale on each other? Look at each other?

SAGAL: You're so close. People tend to exhale on each other when they're doing what?

ROCCA: Talking.

SAGAL: Yes, talking.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Yes. Actors, not only are you supposed to 8 eight feet apart from the other actors in your scenes - you are to remain, quote, "as silent as possible to avoid spreading droplets through talking." Can't wait for the "Braveheart" remake where he just emails the troops. Subject line - re: our freedom - they cannot take it. Scenes with crowds are discouraged. And audiences can be no more than 25% filled. Finally, they can make that movie about your improv shows.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And, of course, no sex scenes or even making out. They're just going to go back to the '50s. Right before two actors shake hands, they fade to black and leave it to your imagination.

KONDABOLU: Wait. They can't do a sex scene with a mask?

SAGAL: No...

KONDABOLU: Is that just - that seems sexier to me. You don't think that's sexier?

SAGAL: Really?

ROCCA: ...Wide-shot.

SALIE: Here we go into Hari's, like, deep, dark desires.

KONDABOLU: Nobody wants a sex scene with a mask?

ROCCA: "Eyes Wide Shut" - I think it would be a great sitcom.

KONDABOLU: Thank you.

(SOUNDBITE OF DJ SHADOW FEAT. RUN THE JEWELS SONG, "NOBODY SPEAK")

SAGAL: Coming up, our panelists extend their brands in our Bluff the Listener game. Call 1-888-WAIT-WAIT to play. We'll be back in a minute with more of WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME from NPR.

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