NASA Dragonfly Mission To Titan Will Explore Origins Of Life : Short Wave NASA is on a mission to explore Titan — the largest moon of Saturn. To do that, scientists are building a nuclear-powered, self-driving drone (technically an octocopter) called Dragonfly. Scheduled to launch in 2026 and arrive on Titan in 2034, Dragonfly could provide clues about how the building blocks of life started here on Earth.
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Octocopter Set to Explore Titan, Saturn's Very Cool Moon

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Octocopter Set to Explore Titan, Saturn's Very Cool Moon

Octocopter Set to Explore Titan, Saturn's Very Cool Moon

Octocopter Set to Explore Titan, Saturn's Very Cool Moon

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/884907920/885016780" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This illustration shows NASA's Dragonfly rotorcraft-lander approaching a site on Saturn's exotic moon, Titan. NASA/JHU-APL hide caption

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NASA/JHU-APL

This illustration shows NASA's Dragonfly rotorcraft-lander approaching a site on Saturn's exotic moon, Titan.

NASA/JHU-APL

NASA is on a mission to explore Titan — the largest moon of Saturn. To do that, scientists are building a nuclear-powered, self-driving drone (technically an octocopter) called Dragonfly. Scheduled to launch in 2026 and arrive on Titan in 2034, Dragonfly could provide clues about how the building blocks of life started here on Earth.

NPR senior science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel speaks with NPR Short Wave reporter Emily Kwong about the Dragonfly mission. You can read more of Geoff's reporting about Dragonfly here.

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This episode was produced by Rebecca Ramirez, edited by Viet Le and fact-checked by Berly McCoy.