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Inflation, Deflation

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Inflation, Deflation

Inflation, Deflation

Inflation, Deflation

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/886036317/899863853" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Found Image Holdings Inc/Corbis via Getty Images
'Greetings from San Diego, California' large letter vintage postcard, 1930s. (Photo by Found Image Holdings/Corbis via Getty Images)
Found Image Holdings Inc/Corbis via Getty Images

Tens of millions of people are out of work. The government is pumping trillions of dollars into the economy. Suddenly, economists are worried about both inflation (rising prices) and deflation (falling prices).

Today on the show: why deflation and high inflation are both really bad. And what signs to watch to see if one or the other is gonna come get us.

Music: "Cheap Leather Jacket," "Yours," "Kiss," and "Trouble."

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