How coronavirus is affecting the U.S. labor market : The Indicator from Planet Money The BLS jobs report for June was better than expected, but showed the U.S. economy is still suffering badly from coronavirus.
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Jobs In June

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Jobs In June

Jobs In June

Jobs In June

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ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images
A woman walks into a restaurant in Glendale, California after Los Angeles County restaurants were forced by state order to shut their doors again to dine-in eating following a spike in COVID-19 cases. (Photo by ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images)
ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images

The Bureau of Labor Statistics report for the month of June was better than expected, but it revealed an economy that's still in rough shape, thanks to the coronavirus pandemic.

There were 4.8 million new jobs created in June. This reflected a lot of businesses, especially restaurants and bars, hiring back workers that they had let go early in the pandemic. But the report is based on data that's three weeks old, and does not reflect business closures that resulted from a recent spike in coronavirus cases. So the picture portrayed by the BLS in its report may not reflect the reality of the economy today.

Today we take a deep dive into the report with our own ninja squad of economists: Martha Gimbel of Schmidt Futures, Gbenga Ajilore of the Center for American Progress, and Nick Bunker of the Indeed Hiring Lab. They have each chosen one indicator from the June jobs report that tells an important story that you probably won't find widely reported elsewhere.

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