If The Pandemic Kept You From Flying, Now You Can At Least Pretend An airport in Taiwan offered to let people go to the terminal, pass through security and sit on board a plane that is going nowhere. Thousands of people applied to do this. Sixty received permission.
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If The Pandemic Kept You From Flying, Now You Can At Least Pretend

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If The Pandemic Kept You From Flying, Now You Can At Least Pretend

If The Pandemic Kept You From Flying, Now You Can At Least Pretend

If The Pandemic Kept You From Flying, Now You Can At Least Pretend

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/887027382/887027383" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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An airport in Taiwan offered to let people go to the terminal, pass through security and sit on board a plane that is going nowhere. Thousands of people applied to do this. Sixty received permission.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. If the pandemic has kept you from flying, you can at least pretend. Reuters reports an airport in Taiwan offered to let people go to the terminal, pass through security and even sit on board a plane that is going nowhere. Thousands of people applied to do this. Sixty received permission to pass through the airport and stay on the ground. They so miss travel that they went out of their way just to do all of the least appealing parts of it.

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