The Long Hot Summer : Throughline Starting in 1965, summer after summer, America's cities burned. There was civil unrest in more than 150 cities across the country. So in 1967, Lyndon Johnson appointed a commission to diagnose the root causes of the problem and to suggest solutions. What the so called "Kerner Commission" returned with was hotly anticipated and shocking to many Americans. This week, how that report and the reaction to it continues to shape American life.
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The Long Hot Summer

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The Long Hot Summer

The Long Hot Summer

The Long Hot Summer

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Starting in 1965, summer after summer, America's cities burned. There was civil unrest in more than 150 cities across the country. So in 1967, Lyndon Johnson appointed a commission to diagnose the root causes of the problem and to suggest solutions. What the so called "Kerner Commission" returned with was hotly anticipated and shocking to many Americans. This week, how that report and the reaction to it continues to shape American life.


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Correction July 17, 2020

In a previous version of this episode we referred to John Lindsay as a senator, he was mayor of New York City at the time. The audio has been changed to reflect this fact.