Why It's Still Hard To File Your Taxes For Free : 1A "Congress has cut the budget of the IRS even as the population has grown, says ProPublica reporter Justin Elliott. "You've seen audits of the wealthy fall off."

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Why It's Still Hard To File Your Taxes For Free

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Why It's Still Hard To File Your Taxes For Free

1A

Why It's Still Hard To File Your Taxes For Free

Why It's Still Hard To File Your Taxes For Free

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/888279316/888463060" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A copy of an IRS 1040 tax form is seen at an H&R Block office. Joe Raedle/Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A copy of an IRS 1040 tax form is seen at an H&R Block office.

Joe Raedle/Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Did you know that if you make less than $69,000 a year, you can file your taxes for free?

You're not alone if you didn't. Last year, over 14 million people paid companies like TurboTax or H&R Block to file their taxes when they could have done it for free.

That's according to an ongoing investigation by ProPublica. They found those companies were intentionally misleading their customers. Last year alone, filers paid these companies about $1 billion dollars when they didn't have to do so.

The filing deadline was delayed this year, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. But they're finally due on July 15.

Justin Elliott, reporter for ProPublica, and Keila Hill-Trawick, Certified Public Accountant and owner of Little Fish Accounting tackled your questions about taxes.

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