How Scientists Contain And Control Flesh-Eating Screw Worms : Short Wave Sarah Zhang wrote about it for the Atlantic: a decades-long scientific operation in Central America that keeps flesh-eating screw worms effectively eradicated from every country north of Panama. Sarah tells the story of the science behind the effort, and the man who came up with it.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

America's 'Never-Ending Battle Against Flesh-Eating Screw Worms'

America's 'Never-Ending Battle Against Flesh-Eating Screw Worms'

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Handout picture taken on June 9, 2010 of a scientist showing sterile screw-worm flies (Cochliomyia hominivorax) larvae, at a laboratory in Pacora, eastern Panama City. Juan Jose Rodriguez/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Juan Jose Rodriguez/AFP via Getty Images

Handout picture taken on June 9, 2010 of a scientist showing sterile screw-worm flies (Cochliomyia hominivorax) larvae, at a laboratory in Pacora, eastern Panama City.

Juan Jose Rodriguez/AFP via Getty Images

Sarah Zhang wrote about it for the Atlantic: a decades-long scientific operation in Central America that keeps flesh-eating screw worms effectively eradicated from every country north of Panama. Sarah tells the story of the science behind the effort, and the man who came up with it.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brent Baughman, edited by Viet Le and fact-checked by Berly McCoy.