Small businesses struggle to reopen and survive : The Indicator from Planet Money Molly Moon's Homemade Ice Cream in Seattle has been on the same economic and political roller coaster ride many small businesses have. Now they're trying to open back up, survive and grow.
NPR logo

The Small Business Roller Coaster

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/889918522/889924006" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
The Small Business Roller Coaster

The Small Business Roller Coaster

The Small Business Roller Coaster

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/889918522/889924006" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Photo by Evan Morud, Art by Morgan Zion/E. Morud Photography
Mural by Morgan Zion at Molly Moon's Capitol Hill store
Photo by Evan Morud, Art by Morgan Zion/E. Morud Photography

When the pandemic first struck, we spoke to a small business owner in Seattle, Molly Moon Neitzel, the CEO of Molly Moon's Homemade Ice Cream. At the time, she was worried about getting enough support from the government to survive. She eventually got a government loan, which helped her keep the lights on.

But since then, things have gotten complicated. She's been targeted on social media by people on both sides of the national debate about policing. And she's had to shift and diversify her product offerings in order to make the money she needs to bridge her business across an uncertain future.

Today we check in with Molly to see how she's doing.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: Twitter / Facebook / Newsletter.

Subscribe to our show on Apple Podcasts, PocketCasts and NPR One.