After Long-Sought Wins For Native Americans, What's Next? : 1A How did activist Amanda Blackhorse feel when the announcement to change the name of Washington D.C.'s football team was made?

"I am very cynical when it comes to the team and their intentions, just because of their history and how they've interacted or not interacted with native people."

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After Long-Sought Wins For Native Americans, What's Next?

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After Long-Sought Wins For Native Americans, What's Next?

1A

After Long-Sought Wins For Native Americans, What's Next?

After Long-Sought Wins For Native Americans, What's Next?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/891465950/891541398" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Protestors rally in Green Bay, Wisconsin prior to a December 2019 game between the Packers and Washington, D.C.'s football team. Stacy Revere/Stacy Revere/Getty Images hide caption

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Stacy Revere/Stacy Revere/Getty Images

Protestors rally in Green Bay, Wisconsin prior to a December 2019 game between the Packers and Washington, D.C.'s football team.

Stacy Revere/Stacy Revere/Getty Images

There have been several big victories for Native American rights in the last week.

One from the Supreme Court on tribal land in Oklahoma.

Another from a federal court on the Dakota Access Pipeline.

And then there's the announcement that Washington D.C.'s football team will change its name.

We talked about the significance of these changes and what they mean for Native American rights, including the Supreme Court ruling and the potential implications it will have for criminal justice on tribal land.

Our guests were Sarah Deer, professor at the University of Kansas and citizen of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation; Jonodev Chaudhuri, ambassador for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation; Kent Blansett, associate professor of Indigenous studies and history at the University of Kansas and a Cherokee, Choctaw, Shawnee, Creek, and Potawatomi descendant.

And Stephanie Fryberg, professor of psychology at the University of Michigan and member of the Tulalip tribes and Amanda Blackhorse, social worker and founder of Arizona to Rally Against Native American Mascots, and a member of the Navajo Nation joined to us talk about the significance of D.C.'s football team name change.

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