Why The U.S. Prison System Makes Mental Illness Worse (And How We Might Fix It) : Fresh Air Dr. Christine Montross says in the U.S., people with serious mental illnesses are far more likely to be incarcerated than to be treated in a psychiatric hospital. Montross studied systemic change in the Norwegian prison system, and what the U.S. might learn from it. Her new book is 'Waiting for an Echo.'

TV critic David Bianculli shares his thoughts on NBC's new streaming platform, Peacock.

Why The U.S. Prison System Makes Mental Illness Worse (And How We Might Fix It)

Why The U.S. Prison System Makes Mental Illness Worse (And How We Might Fix It)

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Dr. Christine Montross says in the U.S., people with serious mental illnesses are far more likely to be incarcerated than to be treated in a psychiatric hospital. Montross studied systemic change in the Norwegian prison system, and what the U.S. might learn from it. Her new book is 'Waiting for an Echo.'

TV critic David Bianculli shares his thoughts on NBC's new streaming platform, Peacock.