Eavesdropping On Whales In A Quiet Ocean : Short Wave The pandemic has led to a drop in ship traffic around the world, which means the oceans are quieter. It could be momentary relief for marine mammals that are highly sensitive to noise. NPR's Lauren Sommer introduces us to scientists who are listening in, hoping to learn how whale communication is changing when the drone of ships is turned down.

Eavesdropping On Whales In A Quiet Ocean

Eavesdropping On Whales In A Quiet Ocean

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A humpback whale in Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve. NPS hide caption

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A humpback whale in Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve.

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The pandemic has led to a drop in ship traffic around the world, which means the oceans are quieter. It could be momentary relief for marine mammals that are highly sensitive to noise. NPR's Lauren Sommer introduces us to scientists who are listening in, hoping to learn how whale communication is changing when the drone of ships is turned down.

Read more of Lauren's reporting on this story here.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Abby Wendle, fact-checked by Rebecca Ramirez, and edited by Viet Le.