The U.S. Postal Service And A Vote-By-Mail Election : 1A "The Postal Service has been doing vote by mail for generations," says Mark Dimondstein of the American Postal Workers Union. "We can continue to deliver for the people as long as we have the support."

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

1A

The U.S. Postal Service And A Vote-By-Mail Election

The U.S. Postal Service And A Vote-By-Mail Election

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/896764162/896778222" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

United States Postal Service mail carrier Frank Colon, 59, delivers mail amid the coronavirus pandemic in El Paso, Texas. PAUL RATJE/PAUL RATJE/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
PAUL RATJE/PAUL RATJE/AFP via Getty Images

United States Postal Service mail carrier Frank Colon, 59, delivers mail amid the coronavirus pandemic in El Paso, Texas.

PAUL RATJE/PAUL RATJE/AFP via Getty Images

It can be easy to take the U.S. Postal Service for granted. They come in the rain, the snow, the sleet and they're reasonably priced.

But the Postal Service has financially struggling for years. They lost over $8 billion in 2019.

And recently, their challenges have only grown. President Donald Trump is a vocal critic. They're "essential workers" in a pandemic. And the new Postmaster General has put a policy in place that some say slows down the mail.

More Americans than ever are expected to use the mail to cast their ballot this November. Is the U.S. Postal Service equipped to handle mail in-voting on a massive scale — in just a matter of months?

Nicole Goodkind, politics reporter for Fortune Magazine; Mark Dimondstein, president of the American Postal Workers Union and Kim Wyman, Washington's Secretary of State spoke to us about what's ahead for the Postal Service.

Like what you hear? Find more of our programs on our website.