The economic case for sharing a coronavirus vaccine : The Indicator from Planet Money The biggest, wealthiest nations in the world are in a race to produce a coronavirus vaccine. It's obviously in a country's interest to win that race and protect its citizens. It's also in its interest to share.
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Sharing The Vaccine

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Sharing The Vaccine

Sharing The Vaccine

Sharing The Vaccine

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Pedro Vilela/Getty Images
BELO HORIZONTE, BRAZIL - MARCH 24: (Photo by Pedro Vilela/Getty Images)
Pedro Vilela/Getty Images

Across the world, there are more than 150 coronavirus vaccine candidates. Governments naturally want to protect their own citizens, ensuring they have access to a vaccine once it's developed. Should it horde the vaccine to make sure all of its own citizens are immunized first, or should it agree in advance with other countries to share the vaccine across borders?

Chad Bown of the Peterson Institute talks to us about why it makes economic and political sense for the country that develops the vaccine first to share with everyone else.

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