What Is Cottagecore? : 1A "I'm a Black Muslim woman, so people don't really see a lot of us in the cottagecore community," influencer Sumaiyuh Jones says. "And it's different to see someone's religion and someone's culture fit into an aesthetic that's usually dominated by a different demographic."

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What Is Cottagecore?

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What Is Cottagecore?

1A

What Is Cottagecore?

What Is Cottagecore?

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Is cottagecore the escapist aesthetic we need to survive 2020? Maggie Hanson/CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 hide caption

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Maggie Hanson/CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Is cottagecore the escapist aesthetic we need to survive 2020?

Maggie Hanson/CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

If you've scrolled through TikTok lately, your feed might be filled with the cottagecore hashtag. It's full of videos of people homemaking, knitting, gardening, baking—activities that have all become popular during the pandemic.

If you're not on TikTok, then perhaps you've seen cottagecore on Instagram or Tumblr or any number of image-sharing apps and websites.

What is it? And why are we drawn to the escapism it provides?

Here to help us answer some of these questions are Rebecca Jennings, internet and culture reporter at Vox; Amanda Brennan, trend expert at Tumblr; and Sumaiyah Jones, influencer.

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