Italian Wine Windows Open During Pandemic, Bringing Back Bubonic Plague Tradition Businesses in Italy are beginning to sell wine and other drinks out of small pint-sized holes. The tradition dates back to the 1600s during the bubonic plague pandemic.
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Italian Wine Windows Open During Pandemic, Bringing Back Bubonic Plague Tradition

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Italian Wine Windows Open During Pandemic, Bringing Back Bubonic Plague Tradition

Italian Wine Windows Open During Pandemic, Bringing Back Bubonic Plague Tradition

Italian Wine Windows Open During Pandemic, Bringing Back Bubonic Plague Tradition

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/900063474/900063475" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Businesses in Italy are beginning to sell wine and other drinks out of small pint-sized holes. The tradition dates back to the 1600s during the bubonic plague pandemic.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. In Italy, wine windows are back. They're a tradition dating back to a previous pandemic. During the bubonic plague in Europe in the 1600s, wine merchants in Tuscany used these pint-sized holes in their winery walls to serve wine and other drinks. And as the region gradually reopens in this pandemic, some wine window owners are once again popping drinks out of those hatches. I'd be cool with an Aperol spritz served to me through a hatch about now, wouldn't you? It's MORNING EDITION.

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