The Chicks On 'Gaslighter' And Why They're Still Speaking Out : World Cafe : World Cafe Words and Music from WXPN The Chicks returns with Gaslighter, the trio's first album in 14 years. Today, Natalie Maines, Martie Maguire and Emily Strayer talk about the album, their past and why they're still speaking out.
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The Chicks On World Cafe

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The Chicks Are Still Speaking Out

The Chicks Are Still Speaking Out

The Chicks On World Cafe

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The Chicks

Philippa Price/Courtesy of the artist

Playlist

  • "Texas Man"
  • "Not Ready To Make Nice"
  • "March March"

The phrase "cancel culture" is getting a lot of attention lately. "Canceling" someone basically means boycotting a person or people in response to their opinions or behavior. Whether or not it's a useful strategy is up for debate, but it's definitely not a new one; just ask The Chicks.

Maybe you remember, back in 2003 when a critical comment about George W. Bush and the Iraq War onstage at a show resulted in a fierce backlash, including radio station boycotts and death threats. According to Martie Maguire, it scared other musicians away from speaking their minds.

"We had heard for a while it was a verb to get 'Dixie-Chicked,' " she says, "and people would openly say 'I feel like I can't say anything. What happened to the Dixie Chicks is going to happen to me.' "

Now, The Chicks are back with Gaslighter, the trio's first album in 14 years. Today, Natalie Maines, Martie Maguire and Emily Strayer talk about the album, their past and why they're still speaking out. Listen in the audio player above.

Episode Playlist