Homeworked: To Reopen Or Not To Reopen : 1A "Are we as schools using science to drive our reopening plans? As superintendents, we're not health experts," says Superintendent PJ Caposey. "When we're told to reopen safely and then not given guidelines about what safety means, it's really hard."

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Homeworked: To Reopen Or Not To Reopen

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Homeworked: To Reopen Or Not To Reopen

1A

Homeworked: To Reopen Or Not To Reopen

Homeworked: To Reopen Or Not To Reopen

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Montgomery County Public Schools Special Needs Bus Attendant Zanashia Rowe helps distribute bags of food donated by Manna Food Center at Quince Orchard High School as part of a program to feed children while schools are closed due to the coronavirus in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Chip Somodevilla/Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Montgomery County Public Schools Special Needs Bus Attendant Zanashia Rowe helps distribute bags of food donated by Manna Food Center at Quince Orchard High School as part of a program to feed children while schools are closed due to the coronavirus in Gaithersburg, Maryland.

Chip Somodevilla/Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

To reopen or not to reopen.

That is the question plaguing school districts around the country as they grapple with how to teach kids this fall. It's still early, but already we've seen what can happen when plans go awry.

A high school in Elwood, Indiana, was forced to close its doors the same week it reopened after a student tested positive for COVID-19 on the first day back. And last week a high school in Georgia made headlines after a picture of mask-less students packed in a hallway went viral—at least nine people have tested positive for COVID-19 from that school.

But the question remains: what is the best way to teach students in the middle of a pandemic?

Here to help us get closer to the answer is Sarah Darville, national editor for Chalkbeat, a non-profit news organization focused on education; PJ Caposey, superintendent for Meridian 223 School District in Illinois; Dr. Lee Beers, president-elect of the American Academy of Pediatrics; Tammy LaPlante, high school custodian in Ashtabula, Ohio.

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