What 'Arrival' Gets Right — And Wrong — About Linguistics : Short Wave The 2016 movie 'Arrival,' an adaptation of Ted Chiang's novella 'Story of Your Life,' captured the imaginations of science fiction fans worldwide. Field linguist Jessica Coon, who consulted on the film, breaks down what the movie gets right — and wrong — about linguistics.

Have ideas for our next installment of the Science Movie Club? Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.
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Science Movie Club: 'Arrival'

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Science Movie Club: 'Arrival'

Science Movie Club: 'Arrival'

Science Movie Club: 'Arrival'

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Amy Adams stars as linguistics professor Louise Banks in the 2016 movie Arrival, adapted from a Ted Chiang short story. Jan Thijs/Paramount hide caption

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Jan Thijs/Paramount

Amy Adams stars as linguistics professor Louise Banks in the 2016 movie Arrival, adapted from a Ted Chiang short story.

Jan Thijs/Paramount

The 2016 movie 'Arrival,' an adaptation of Ted Chiang's novella 'Story of Your Life,' captured the imaginations of science fiction fans worldwide. Field linguist Jessica Coon, who consulted on the film, breaks down what the movie gets right — and wrong — about linguistics.

Have ideas for our next installment of the Science Movie Club? Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced & fact-checked by Brit Hanson and edited by Viet Le.