Save The Parasites : Short Wave Saving endangered species usually brings to mind tigers or whales. But scientists say many parasites are also at risk of extinction. Short Wave's Emily Kwong talks with Chelsea Wood, an Assistant Professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington, who tells us about the important role parasites play in ecosystems and a new global plan to protect them.
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Save The Parasites

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Save The Parasites

Save The Parasites

Save The Parasites

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Parasites play crucial roles in keeping ecosystems healthy, as does this larval trypanorhynch tapeworm, which infects fish. Chelsea Wood hide caption

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Chelsea Wood

Parasites play crucial roles in keeping ecosystems healthy, as does this larval trypanorhynch tapeworm, which infects fish.

Chelsea Wood

Saving endangered species usually brings to mind tigers or whales. But scientists say many parasites are also at risk of extinction. Short Wave's Emily Kwong talks with Chelsea Wood, an Assistant Professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington, who tells us about the important role parasites play in ecosystems and a new global plan to protect them.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Abby Wendle, fact-checked by Emily Kwong and edited by Viet Le.